The cost-effectiveness of installing sidewalks to increase levels of transport-walking and health

Gunn, L. D., Lee, Y., Geelhoed, E., Shiell, A. and Giles-Corti, B. (2014) The cost-effectiveness of installing sidewalks to increase levels of transport-walking and health. Preventive Medicine, 67 322-329. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.041


Author Gunn, L. D.
Lee, Y.
Geelhoed, E.
Shiell, A.
Giles-Corti, B.
Title The cost-effectiveness of installing sidewalks to increase levels of transport-walking and health
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.041
Volume 67
Start page 322
End page 329
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of installing sidewalks to increase levels of transport-walking.

Methods: Secondary analysis using logistic regression established the association of sidewalks with transport-walking using two transport-walking thresholds of 150 and 60 min/week using Western Australian data (n = 1394) from 1995 to 2000. Minimum, moderate and maximum interventions were defined, associated respectively with one sidewalk, at least one sidewalk and sidewalks on both sides of the street. Costs, average and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated for each intervention and expressed as 'the cost per person who walks for transport for more than 150 min/week (60 min/week) after the installation of new sidewalks'. A sensitivity analysis examined the robustness of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios to varying model inputs. Costs are in 2012 Australian dollars.

Results: A positive relationship was found between the presence of sidewalks and transport-walking for both transport-walking thresholds of 150 and 60 min/week. The minimum intervention was found to be the most cost-effective at $2330/person and $674/person for the 150 and 60 min/week transport-walking thresholds respectively. Increasing the proportion of people transport-walking and increasing population density by 50% improved the cost-effectiveness of installing side-walks to $346/person.

Conclusions: To increase levels of transport-walking, retrofitting streets with one sidewalk is most cost-effective.
Keyword Physical activity
Active Transportation
Built environment
Public health
Economic Analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 25 Oct 2014, 02:43:17 EST by Yong Yi Lee on behalf of School of Public Health