Social mobbing calls in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): effects of experience and associated cortisol levels.

Clara, Elena, Tommasi, Luca and Rogers, Lesley J. (2008) Social mobbing calls in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): effects of experience and associated cortisol levels.. Animal Cognition, 11 2: 349-358. doi:10.1007/s10071-007-0125-0


Author Clara, Elena
Tommasi, Luca
Rogers, Lesley J.
Title Social mobbing calls in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): effects of experience and associated cortisol levels.
Journal name Animal Cognition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1435-9448
1435-9456
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10071-007-0125-0
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 349
End page 358
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We compared the mobbing response to model snakes of two groups of captive-born common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) differing in genetic relatedness, age and past experience. Mobbing vocalisations (tsik calls), other mobbing behaviour and attention to the stimulus were recorded for 2 min. intervals pre-exposure, during exposure to various stimuli and post-exposure. Marmosets in one group were vocally reactive to all stimuli, although more so to one particular stimulus resembling rearing snakes and modified images of it, whereas the marmosets in a younger and genetically unrelated group attended to the stimuli but made very few mobbing calls. The parent stock of the first group had suffered stress in early life and had developed a phobic response to a specific stimulus, which they had transmitted to their offspring. A third group, matching the older group in age range but genetically unrelated, was also found to be unresponsive to the stimulus that elicited the strongest response in the first group. Cortisol levels in samples of hair were assayed and a significant negative correlation was found between the number of tsik calls made during presentation of the stimuli and the cortisol level, showing that mobbing behaviour/behavioural reactivity is associated with low levels of physiological stress.
Keyword Age
Common marmoset
Cortisol in hair
Cultural transmission
Mobbing snakes
Vocalisations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes For ERA

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 25 Oct 2014, 02:17:53 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute