Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): a missing link in the evolution of complementary side biases for predator avoidance and prey capture.

lippolis, G., Joss, J. M. and Rogers, L. J. (2009) Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): a missing link in the evolution of complementary side biases for predator avoidance and prey capture.. Brain Behaviour and Evolution, 73 4: 295-303. doi:10.1159/000230674


Author lippolis, G.
Joss, J. M.
Rogers, L. J.
Title Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): a missing link in the evolution of complementary side biases for predator avoidance and prey capture.
Journal name Brain Behaviour and Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-8977
1421-9743
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1159/000230674
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 73
Issue 4
Start page 295
End page 303
Total pages 9
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher S. Karger AG
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Side biases in behavior, reflecting lateral specializations of the brain, are widespread amongst vertebrates. We studied laterality in the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) to gain insight into the evolution of the complementary specializations of predator avoidance (right hemisphere) and foraging behavior (left hemisphere). Because N. forsteri is the closest extant ancestor of the first land-dwelling vertebrates, knowledge of laterality in this species should provide a missing link in the transition from fish to tetrapods. Predator escape responses were elicited by generating pressure waves and a significant bias for C-start responses to the left side was found. This bias was unaffected by activity levels that change according to a diurnal cycle: activity is higher in the dark phase than the light phase. A complementary bias to turn to the right side was found during feeding behavior. This pattern of opposite-side specializations matches that known for fish, anurans, reptiles, birds and, as some evidence indicates, also mammals. Hence, we conclude that it is a homologous pattern of lateralization that evolved in early aquatic vertebrates and was retained as they made the transition to land-dwelling tetrapods.
Keyword Activity
Evolution
Feeding
Lateralization
Lungfish
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes For ERA

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 25 Oct 2014, 01:06:50 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute