Reverse causation in the association between C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels and cognitive abilities in an aging sample.

Luciano, Michelle, Marioni, Riccardo, Gow. Alan J., Starr, John M. and Deary, Ian J. (2009) Reverse causation in the association between C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels and cognitive abilities in an aging sample.. Psychosomatic Medicine, 71 4: 404-409. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181a24fb9


Author Luciano, Michelle
Marioni, Riccardo
Gow. Alan J.
Starr, John M.
Deary, Ian J.
Title Reverse causation in the association between C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels and cognitive abilities in an aging sample.
Journal name Psychosomatic Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0033-3174
1534-7796
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181a24fb9
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 71
Issue 4
Start page 404
End page 409
Total pages 6
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To test the hypothesis that increased levels of inflammatory and hemostatic markers are associated with poorer cognitive performance and to assess the influence of childhood intelligence quotient (IQ) and current cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on this relationship. Blood inflammatory markers have been shown to predict late-life cognition, although the mechanism through which this occurs is unknown.

Methods: Levels of the biomarkers C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were measured in 1053 Scottish participants (50.2% female) from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 ranging in age from 67 to 71 years. Biomarker levels were tested for their association with diverse cognitive abilities.

Results: Significant cross-sectional associations were found between the biomarkers and various cognitive abilities: their effect size was around 1% of the variance and was in the direction of higher marker levels conferring poorer cognitive performance. With the exception of the reaction time measures (and fibrinogen), these associations could be explained by childhood IQ, CVD risk factors, or both. Importantly, both the inflammatory markers at age 70 years were associated (p < .001) with childhood IQ.

Conclusions: Whereas inflammatory marker levels predict contemporaneous general cognitive ability, the results support a model of reverse causation because childhood IQ predicts late-life inflammation. This might be through its association with later life CVD risk factors or because it is a measure of system integrity. Unlike general cognitive ability, the association between inflammatory markers (particularly fibrinogen) and processing speed was maintained in the presence of childhood IQ and/or CVD risk factor adjustments. This might also reflect variation in physiological integrity.
Keyword Inflammation
Hemostasis
Cognitive ability
Processing Speed
Cognitive aging
Normal population
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes For ERA

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 24 Oct 2014, 22:52:26 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute