Review of effect of oxygen on room temperature ductility of titanium and titanium alloys

Yan, M., Xu, W., Dargusch, M. S., Tang, H. P., Brandt, M. and Qian, M. (2014) Review of effect of oxygen on room temperature ductility of titanium and titanium alloys. Powder Metallurgy, 57 4: 251-257. doi:10.1179/1743290114Y.0000000108


Author Yan, M.
Xu, W.
Dargusch, M. S.
Tang, H. P.
Brandt, M.
Qian, M.
Title Review of effect of oxygen on room temperature ductility of titanium and titanium alloys
Journal name Powder Metallurgy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-5899
1743-2901
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1179/1743290114Y.0000000108
Volume 57
Issue 4
Start page 251
End page 257
Total pages 7
Place of publication Leeds, W Yorks, United Kingdom
Publisher Maney Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 2505 Materials Chemistry
2506 Metals and Alloys
2503 Ceramics and Composites
2211 Mechanics of Materials
3104 Condensed Matter Physics
Abstract Room temperature tensile ductility is an important property of titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys for structural applications. This article reviews the dependency of tensile ductility on oxygen for α-Ti, (α+β)-Ti and β-Ti alloys fabricated via traditional ingot metallurgy (IM), powder metallurgy (PM) and additive manufacturing (AM) or three-dimensional printing methods and recent advances in understanding the effect of oxygen on ductility. Seven mechanisms have been discussed based on case studies of individual titanium materials reported in literature. The dependency of ductility on oxygen is determined by both the composition and microstructure of the titanium alloy. For Ti–6Al–4V (wt-%), as sintered Ti–6Al–4V shows a critical oxygen level of about 0·33 wt-% while additively manufactured Ti–6Al–4V exhibits different critical levels ranging from about 0·22% to well above 0·4% depending on microstructure. Rare earth (RE) elements are effective scavengers of oxygen in titanium materials even just with a small addition (e.g. 0·1 wt-%), irrespective of the manufacturing method (IM, PM and AM). High cycle fatigue experiments revealed no initiation of fatigue cracks from the resulting RE oxide particles over the size range from submicrometres to a few micrometres. A small addition of RE elements offers a practical and affordable approach to mitigating the detrimental effect of oxygen on ductility.
Keyword Titanium alloys
Oxygen
Tensile ductility
Powder metallurgy
Additive manufacturing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: School of Mechanical & Mining Engineering Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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