Long-term follow-up of all-cause and unnatural death in young people with first-episode psychosis

Yuen, Kally, Harrigan, Susy M., Mackinnon, Andrew J., Harris, Meredith G., Yuen, Hok Pan, Henry, Lisa P., Jackson, Henry J., Herrman, Helen and McGorry, Patrick D. (2014) Long-term follow-up of all-cause and unnatural death in young people with first-episode psychosis. Schizophrenia Research, 159 1: 70-75. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2014.07.042


Author Yuen, Kally
Harrigan, Susy M.
Mackinnon, Andrew J.
Harris, Meredith G.
Yuen, Hok Pan
Henry, Lisa P.
Jackson, Henry J.
Herrman, Helen
McGorry, Patrick D.
Title Long-term follow-up of all-cause and unnatural death in young people with first-episode psychosis
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0920-9964
1573-2509
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2014.07.042
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 159
Issue 1
Start page 70
End page 75
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
2803 Biological Psychiatry
Abstract Objective: To determine mortality-related estimates and causes of death in young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP), and to identify baseline predictors of mortality. Method: Mortality outcomes in 723 young people presenting to an early psychosis service were prospectively ascertained up to 20. years. Predictors of all-cause and unnatural death were investigated using survival techniques. Results: Forty-nine participants died by study end. Most deaths (n. =. 41) occurred within 10. years of service entry. All-cause mortality was 5.5% at 10. years, rising to 8.0% after 20. years. Unnatural death rates at 10 and 20. years were 5.0% and 5.9%, respectively. Three risk factors consistently predicted all-cause mortality and unnatural deaths. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of excess mortality was due to non-suicide unnatural death, and, later, natural deaths. This suggests that mental health services should expand their current focus on suicide to incorporate strategies to prevent accidental death and promote healthier lifestyles.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine mortality-related estimates and causes of death in young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP), and to identify baseline predictors of mortality.

Method: Mortality outcomes in 723 young people presenting to an early psychosis service were prospectively ascertained up to 20 years. Predictors of all-cause and unnatural death were investigated using survival techniques.

Results: Forty-nine participants died by study end. Most deaths (n = 41) occurred within 10 years of service entry. All-cause mortality was 5.5% at 10 years, rising to 8.0% after 20 years. Unnatural death rates at 10 and 20 years were 5.0% and 5.9%, respectively. Three risk factors consistently predicted all-cause mortality and unnatural deaths.

Conclusion: A substantial proportion of excess mortality was due to non-suicide unnatural death, and, later, natural deaths. This suggests that mental health services should expand their current focus on suicide to incorporate strategies to prevent accidental death and promote healthier lifestyles.
Keyword Mortality
Unnatural death
Psychotic disorders
Follow-up studies
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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