World-Wide what? Assigning Students to Publish on the Web

Rifkin, Will (2012). World-Wide what? Assigning Students to Publish on the Web. In Jim Peterson, Okhwa Lee and Matthew Piscioneri (Ed.), Effectively Implementing Information Communication Technology in Higher Education in the Asia-Pacific Region (pp. 345-370) New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Author Rifkin, Will
Title of chapter World-Wide what? Assigning Students to Publish on the Web
Title of book Effectively Implementing Information Communication Technology in Higher Education in the Asia-Pacific Region
Place of Publication New York
Publisher Nova Science Publishers
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Other
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Series Education in a competitive and globalizing world series
ISBN 9781619425736
Editor Jim Peterson
Okhwa Lee
Matthew Piscioneri
Chapter number 22
Start page 345
End page 370
Total pages 26
Total chapters 23
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The web has a unique ability to enable involvement of a range of stakeholders in a university assignment. That is revealed by a case study of the World-Wide Day in Science project (WWDS) in the period 2003-2010. This chapter illustrates the hurdles faced and opportunities realised in having university students in science assigned to build an online career guide for high school students. The WWDS project affords a form of ―authentic‖ assessment as students create a real product for a real audience addressing a real need – declining science enrolments. WWDS requires students to engage in teamwork, the critical thinking involved in peer review, and the ethics of asking for permission to publish an interview. Such graduate attributes are an area in science that surveys of employers and graduates indicate requires attention. The educational value of WWDS has been assessed favourably from a range of disciplinary perspectives. The Day in Science website receives over 1 million ―hits‖ per year. Yet, the approach has failed to spread widely as a learning activity at either universities or high schools. The chapter recounts a history of the WWDS project. Stakeholders are identified along with attractions and barriers that each one faces. These factors are analysed in terms of parameters from Rogers‘s classic framework on diffusion of innovations. Implications are drawn for implementation of student web publication in universities in the highly multi-cultural Asia-Pacific. One conclusion is that the web engages a range of stakeholders into the interplay between academic and student in ways that both enable and frustrate learning by students and dissemination among staff. It is indeed a tangled and sticky web.
Keyword Web 2.0,
Publishing
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Sustainable Minerals Institute Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 16 Oct 2014, 21:10:44 EST by Sheryllee Johnson on behalf of Centre for Coal Seam Gas