Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice

Jacob, Elisabeth R., McKenna, Lisa and D’Amore, Angelo (2014) Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice. Australian Health Review, 38 4: 432-439. doi:10.1071/AH13216


Author Jacob, Elisabeth R.
McKenna, Lisa
D’Amore, Angelo
Title Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH13216
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 4
Start page 432
End page 439
Total pages 8
Place of publication Clayton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This paper reports on a project to examine the expectations of senior nurses regarding graduate roles of registered and enrolled nurses educated in Victoria, Australia.

Methods: Participants completed an online survey to indicate whether predetermined competencies were in the roles of graduate enrolled or registered nurses or not in the role of either nurse. Chi-squared analysis was used to identify differences between participant groups.

Results: Participants expressed variations in role expectations for the different level of graduate nurse. Although basic nursing care was undertaken by both graduate enrolled and registered nurses, no specific role was identified for enrolled nurses. Differences were found in the opinions of senior nurses over the roles of graduate nurses, demonstrating considerable variation in expectations. Management, education and research roles were not identified as the role of either nurse on graduation. Differences were found in the expectations of the different senior nurse groups regarding the roles of the enrolled nurse, particularly in the new skills taught in the enrolled nurse diploma program.

Conclusions: Confusion exists regarding the roles of both types of nurse on graduation. Further research across Australia is required to clarify the roles of the different level of nurse in different practice contexts. 
Keyword Education, Scientific Disciplines
Nursing
Education & Educational Research
Nursing
NURSING, SCI
NURSING, SSCI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 914-043
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Oct 2014, 21:46:37 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work