Emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanniias the major cause of ventilatorassociated pneumonia in intensive care unit patients at an infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam

Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh, Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong, Campbell, James I., Parry, Christopher M., Thompson, Corinne, Tuyen, Ha Thanh, Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh, Tam, Pham Thi Thanh, Le, Vien Minh, Nga, Tran Vu Thieu, Nhu, Tran Do Hoang, Van Minh, Pham, Nga, Nguyen Thi Thu, Thuy, Cao Thu, Dung, Le Thi, Yen, Nguyen Thi Thu, Hao, Nguyen Van, Loan, Huynh Thi, Nghia, Ho Dang Trung, Hien, Tran Tinh, Thwaites, Louise, Thwaites, Guy, Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh and Baker, Stephen (2014) Emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanniias the major cause of ventilatorassociated pneumonia in intensive care unit patients at an infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam. Journal of Medical Microbiology, 63 Pt 10: 1386-1394. doi:10.1099/jmm.0.076646-0


Author Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh
Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong
Campbell, James I.
Parry, Christopher M.
Thompson, Corinne
Tuyen, Ha Thanh
Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh
Tam, Pham Thi Thanh
Le, Vien Minh
Nga, Tran Vu Thieu
Nhu, Tran Do Hoang
Van Minh, Pham
Nga, Nguyen Thi Thu
Thuy, Cao Thu
Dung, Le Thi
Yen, Nguyen Thi Thu
Hao, Nguyen Van
Loan, Huynh Thi
Nghia, Ho Dang Trung
Hien, Tran Tinh
Thwaites, Louise
Thwaites, Guy
Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh
Baker, Stephen
Title Emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanniias the major cause of ventilatorassociated pneumonia in intensive care unit patients at an infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam
Formatted title
Emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanniias the major cause of ventilatorassociated pneumonia in intensive care unit patients at an infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam
Journal name Journal of Medical Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-2615
1473-5644
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1099/jmm.0.076646-0
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 63
Issue Pt 10
Start page 1386
End page 1394
Total pages 9
Place of publication Reading, Berks, United Kingdom
Publisher Society for General Microbiology
Language eng
Subject 2404 Microbiology
2726 Microbiology (medical)
Abstract Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious healthcare-associated infection that affects up to 30 % of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. The bacterial aetiology and corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility of VAP is highly variable, and can differ between countries, national provinces and even between different wards in the same hospital. We aimed to understand and document changes in the causative agents of VAP and their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles retrospectively over an 11 year period in a major infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam. Our analysis outlined a significant shift from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Acinetobacter spp. as the most prevalent bacteria isolated from quantitative tracheal aspirates in patients with VAP in this setting. Antimicrobial resistance was common across all bacterial species and we found a marked proportional annual increase in carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. over a 3 year period from 2008 (annual trend; odds ratio 1.656, P = 0.010). We further investigated the possible emergence of a carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clone by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis, finding a blaOXA-23-positive strain that was associated with an upsurge in the isolation of this pathogen. We additionally identified a single blaNDM-1-positive A. baumannii isolate. This work highlights the emergence of a carbapenem-resistant clone of A. baumannii and a worrying trend of antimicrobial resistance in the ICU of the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
Formatted abstract
Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious healthcare-associated infection that affects up to 30 % of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. The bacterial aetiology and corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility of VAP is highly variable, and can differ between countries, national provinces and even between different wards in the same hospital. We aimed to understand and document changes in the causative agents of VAP and their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles retrospectively over an 11 year period in a major infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam. Our analysis outlined a significant shift from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Acinetobacter spp. as the most prevalent bacteria isolated from quantitative tracheal aspirates in patients with VAP in this setting. Antimicrobial resistance was common across all bacterial species and we found a marked proportional annual increase in carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. over a 3 year period from 2008 (annual trend; odds ratio 1.656, P = 0.010). We further investigated the possible emergence of a carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clone by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis, finding a blaOXA-23-positive strain that was associated with an upsurge in the isolation of this pathogen. We additionally identified a single blaNDM-1-positive A. baumannii isolate. This work highlights the emergence of a carbapenem-resistant clone of A. baumannii and a worrying trend of antimicrobial resistance in the ICU of the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 100087
089276/2/09/2
100087/Z/12/Z
WT/093724/Z/10/Z
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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