Neuroscience and organizational behavior: avoiding both neuro-euphoria and neuro-phobia

Ashkanasy, Neal M., Becker, William J. and Waldman, David A. (2014) Neuroscience and organizational behavior: avoiding both neuro-euphoria and neuro-phobia. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35 7: 909-919. doi:10.1002/job.1952

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Author Ashkanasy, Neal M.
Becker, William J.
Waldman, David A.
Title Neuroscience and organizational behavior: avoiding both neuro-euphoria and neuro-phobia
Journal name Journal of Organizational Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0894-3796
1099-1379
Publication date 2014-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/job.1952
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 35
Issue 7
Start page 909
End page 919
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Subject 3202 Applied Psychology
3312 Sociology and Political Science
3200 Psychology
1407 Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
Abstract Organizational neuroscience has great promise for advancing organizational research and practice. The field, however, is developing rapidly and has also become the subject of technological and methodological challenges that must be considered when conducting or interpreting neuroscience research as applied to organizational behavior. We explore four issues we deem to be important in understanding the role of neuroscience in organizational behavior research: (i) neuroscientific research and reductionism; (ii) the need to address methodological and technological challenges in conducting this type of research; (iii) how neuroscientific research is meaningful in organizations (the "So what?" issue); and (iv) neuroscience as just another management fad. In addressing these issues, we hope to set out a roadmap that will enable organizational scholars to avoid past mistakes and thus serve to advance multidisciplinary research in organizational behavior using neuroscientific approaches.
Formatted abstract
Organizational neuroscience has great promise for advancing organizational research and practice. The field, however, is developing rapidly and has also become the subject of technological and methodological challenges that must be considered when conducting or interpreting neuroscience research as applied to organizational behavior. We explore four issues we deem to be important in understanding the role of neuroscience in organizational behavior research: (i) neuroscientific research and reductionism; (ii) the need to address methodological and technological challenges in conducting this type of research; (iii) how neuroscientific research is meaningful in organizations (the “So what?” issue); and (iv) neuroscience as just another management fad. In addressing these issues, we hope to set out a roadmap that will enable organizational scholars to avoid past mistakes and thus serve to advance multidisciplinary research in organizational behavior using neuroscientific approaches.
Keyword Organizational neuroscience
Management fads
Electroencephalograph
fMRI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 21 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 22 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 20 Sep 2014, 00:16:06 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School