Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding

Fallon, Anne, Van der Putten, Deirdre, Dring, Cindy, Moylett, Edina H., Fealy, Gerard and Devane, Declan (2014) Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 7 CD009067.1-CD009067.22. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009067.pub2

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Author Fallon, Anne
Van der Putten, Deirdre
Dring, Cindy
Moylett, Edina H.
Fealy, Gerard
Devane, Declan
Title Baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding
Journal name Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-493X
Publication date 2014-07-31
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD009067.pub2
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume Issue 7
Start page CD009067.1
End page CD009067.22
Total pages 23
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This review demonstrates that there is no evidence from randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding for successful breastfeeding, for healthy newborns, therefore no conclusions could be taken at this point. It is recommended that no changes are made to current practice guidelines without undertaking further robust research, to include many patterns of breastfeeding and not limited to baby-led and scheduled breastfeeding. Further research is needed to also evaluate the effects of baby-led compared with scheduled (or mixed) breastfeeding on successful breastfeeding, for healthy newborns. However, conducting such a study, particularly a randomised controlled trial is unlikely to receive ethical approval, as the issue of obtaining informed consent from new mothers or mothers-to-be for randomisation between baby-led and scheduled breastfeeding is a difficult one and it is likely that the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative practices would prohibit such a study.
Keyword Care practices
Fed infants
Mother nursing behaviour
Randomized Control Trial
Weight gain
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 18 Sep 2014, 23:51:39 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work