Does early socio-economic disadvantage predict comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders?

Salom, Caroline L., Williams, Gail M., Najman, Jake M. and Alati, Rosa (2014) Does early socio-economic disadvantage predict comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders?. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 142 146-153. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.06.011

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Author Salom, Caroline L.
Williams, Gail M.
Najman, Jake M.
Alati, Rosa
Title Does early socio-economic disadvantage predict comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders?
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Dependence   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-0046
0376-8716
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.06.011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 142
Start page 146
End page 153
Total pages 8
Place of publication Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 3005 Toxicology
3004 Pharmacology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
2736 Pharmacology (medical)
Abstract Background: Alcohol and mental health disorders are highly prevalent in the general population, with co-occurrence recognised as a major public health issue. Socio-economic factors are frequently associated with both disorders but their temporal association is unclear. This paper examines the association between prenatal socio-economic disadvantage and comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders at young adulthood.
Formatted abstract
Background: Alcohol and mental health disorders are highly prevalent in the general population, with co-occurrence recognised as a major public health issue. Socio-economic factors are frequently associated with both disorders but their temporal association is unclear. This paper examines the association between prenatal socio-economic disadvantage and comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders at young adulthood.

Methods: An unselected cohort of women was enrolled during early pregnancy in the large longitudinal Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP), at the Mater Misericordiae Public Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. The mothers and their offspring were followed over a 21 year period. Offspring from the MUSP birth cohort who provided full psychiatric information at age 21 and whose mothers provided socioeconomic information at baseline were included (n= 2399). Participants were grouped into no-disorder, mental health disorder only, alcohol disorder only or comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders according to DSM-IV diagnoses at age 21 as assessed by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to compare associations of disorder group with single measures of prenatal socio-economic disadvantage including family income, parental education and employment, and then created a cumulative scale of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Results: Greater socio-economic disadvantage was more strongly associated with comorbidity (OR 3.36; CI95 1.37, 8.24) than with single disorders. This relationship was not fully accounted for by maternal mental health, smoking and drinking during pregnancy.

Conclusion: Multiple domains of socio-economic disadvantage in early life are associated with comorbid alcohol and mental health disorders.
Keyword Alcohol
Comorbid
Longitudinal
Mental health
Socioeconomic
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 1009460
APP1012485
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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