Moving beyond economic framing of the Australian coal industry

Worden, S., Kirsch, A. and Kirsch, P. A. (2014). Moving beyond economic framing of the Australian coal industry. In: Life-of-Mine 2014: Delivering sustainable legacies through integrated life-of-mine planning. Life-of-Mine 2014, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (365-375). 16-18 July 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Worden, S.
Kirsch, A.
Kirsch, P. A.
Title of paper Moving beyond economic framing of the Australian coal industry
Conference name Life-of-Mine 2014
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 16-18 July 2014
Convener David Mulligan
Proceedings title Life-of-Mine 2014: Delivering sustainable legacies through integrated life-of-mine planning
Series The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Publication Series No 4/2014
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher AUSIMM
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781925100082
Start page 365
End page 375
Total pages 11
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Despite the current downturn, coal remains an important commodity in the Australian economy. Increasing coal resource development has resulted in increasing competition for land use in coal mining regions across the country with communities and other stakeholders becoming more adept at articulating their concerns regarding this competition in a range of traditional and social forms of media. In this environment, obtaining and maintaining a social licence to operate (SLO) is problematic and has been identified as the fourth greatest risk facing the international mining industry. This research presents the findings from a longitudinal study on how Australian newspapers frame the views of coal mining stakeholders across each stage of the coal mining life cycle. News stories from national, state and regional newspapers in 2000, 2006 and 2013 were analysed. Over the study period, there have been significant changes in the coal mining themes being covered by Australian newspapers, the number of stories being published, the number of newspapers covering coal mining stories, and the diversity of stakeholders being quoted. How do the dominant themes in media communication change over time? How do these changes impact mining across the life-of-mine? The research confirmed that Australian journalists use framing, priming, labels and bias to conceptualise and understand the events that they report, and that this behaviour has a profound effect on public opinion.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://www.lifeofmine2014.ausimm.com.au/

 
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Created: Thu, 21 Aug 2014, 22:15:01 EST by Mrs Barbara Whittaker on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre