Comprehensive metabolomics to evaluate the impact of industrial processing on the phytochemical composition of vegetable purees

Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia, de Vos, R. C. H., Jonker, H. H., Mumm, R., Hall, R. D., Bialek, L., Leenman, R., Strassburg, K., Vreeken, R., Hankemeier, T., Schumm, S. and van Duynhoven. J. (2015) Comprehensive metabolomics to evaluate the impact of industrial processing on the phytochemical composition of vegetable purees. Food Chemistry, 168 348-355. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.07.076


Author Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
de Vos, R. C. H.
Jonker, H. H.
Mumm, R.
Hall, R. D.
Bialek, L.
Leenman, R.
Strassburg, K.
Vreeken, R.
Hankemeier, T.
Schumm, S.
van Duynhoven. J.
Title Comprehensive metabolomics to evaluate the impact of industrial processing on the phytochemical composition of vegetable purees
Journal name Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-7072
0308-8146
Publication date 2015-02-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.07.076
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 168
Start page 348
End page 355
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The effects of conventional industrial processing steps on global phytochemical composition of broccoli, tomato and carrot purees were investigated by using a range of complementary targeted and untargeted metabolomics approaches including LC-PDA for vitamins, 1H NMR for polar metabolites, accurate mass LC-QTOF MS for semi-polar metabolites, LC-MRM for oxylipins, and headspace GC-MS for volatile compounds. An initial exploratory experiment indicated that the order of blending and thermal treatments had the highest impact on the phytochemicals in the purees. This blending-heating order effect was investigated in more depth by performing alternate blending-heating sequences in triplicate on the same batches of broccoli, tomato and carrot. For each vegetable and particularly in broccoli, a large proportion of the metabolites detected in the purees was significantly influenced by the blending-heating order, amongst which were potential health-related phytochemicals and flavour compounds like vitamins C and E, carotenoids, flavonoids, glucosinolates and oxylipins. Our metabolomics data indicates that during processing the activity of a series of endogenous plant enzymes, such as lipoxygenases, peroxidases and glycosidases, including myrosinase in broccoli, is key to the final metabolite composition and related quality of the purees.
Keyword Metabolomics
Vitamins
Tomato
Broccoli
Carrot
Puree
Processing
LC-MS
GC-MS
NMR
LC-MRM MS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 24 July 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official Audit
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 Aug 2014, 10:13:12 EST by System User on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation