A right to flee: refugees, states, and the construction of international cooperation

Orchard, Phil A right to flee: refugees, states, and the construction of international cooperation. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2014. doi:10.1017/CBO9781139923293

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Author Orchard, Phil
Title A right to flee: refugees, states, and the construction of international cooperation
Place of Publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication year 2014
Sub-type Research book (original research)
DOI 10.1017/CBO9781139923293
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9781107076259
Language eng
Start page 1
End page 297
Total number of pages 320
Year available 2014
Subjects 3300 Social Sciences
Abstract/Summary Why do states protect refugees? In the past twenty years, states have sought to limit access to asylum by increasing their border controls and introducing extraterritorial controls. Yet no state has sought to exit the 1951 Refugee Convention or the broader international refugee regime. This book argues that such international policy shifts represent an ongoing process whereby refugee protection is shaped and redefined by states and other actors. Since the seventeenth century, a mix of collective interests and basic normative understandings held by states created a space for refugees to be separate from other migrants. However, ongoing crisis events undermine these understandings and provide opportunities to reshape how refugees are understood, how they should be protected, and whether protection is a state or multilateral responsibility. Drawing on extensive archival and secondary materials, Phil Orchard examines the interplay among governments, individuals, and international organizations that has shaped how refugees are understood today.
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Why do states protect refugees? In the past twenty years, states have sought to limit access to asylum by increasing their border controls and introducing extraterritorial controls. Yet no state has sought to exit the 1951 Refugee Convention or the broader international refugee regime. This book argues that such international policy shifts represent an ongoing process whereby refugee protection is shaped and redefined by states and other actors. Since the seventeenth century, a mix of collective interests and basic normative understandings held by states created a space for refugees to be separate from other migrants. However, ongoing crisis events undermine these understandings and provide opportunities to reshape how refugees are understood, how they should be protected, and whether protection is a state or multilateral responsibility. Drawing on extensive archival and secondary materials, Phil Orchard examines the interplay among governments, individuals, and international organizations that has shaped how refugees are understood today.
Keyword Refugees
Norms
UNHCR
League of Nations
Refugee protection
Constructivism
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 18 Aug 2014, 20:44:59 EST by Dr Phil Orchard on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies