Visceral adiposity is not associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and growth

Cronin, Oliver, Liu, David, Bradshaw, Barbara, Iyer, Vikram, Buttner, Petra, Cunningham, Margaret, Walker, Philip J. and Golledge, Jonathan (2014) Visceral adiposity is not associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and growth. Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom), 19 4: 272-280. doi:10.1177/1358863X14537883


Author Cronin, Oliver
Liu, David
Bradshaw, Barbara
Iyer, Vikram
Buttner, Petra
Cunningham, Margaret
Walker, Philip J.
Golledge, Jonathan
Title Visceral adiposity is not associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and growth
Journal name Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom)   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-0377
1358-863X
Publication date 2014-08-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1358863X14537883
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 19
Issue 4
Start page 272
End page 280
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher SAGE Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Previous studies in rodent models and patients suggest that visceral adipose could play a direct role in the development and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). This study aimed to assess the association of visceral adiposity with AAA presence and growth. This study was a case–control investigation of patients that did (n=196) and did not (n=181) have an AAA who presented to The Townsville Hospital vascular clinic between 2003 and 2012. Cases were patients with AAA (infra-renal aortic diameter >30 mm) and controls were patients with intermittent claudication but no AAA (infra-renal aortic diameter <30 mm). All patients underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA). The visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio was estimated from CTAs by assessing total and visceral adipose deposits using an imaging software program. Measurements were assessed for reproducibility by repeat assessments on 15 patients. AAA risk factors were recorded at entry. Forty-five cases underwent two CTAs more than 6 months apart to assess AAA expansion. The association of visceral adiposity with AAA presence and growth was examined using logistic regression. Visceral adipose assessment by CTA was highly reproducible (mean coefficient of variation 1.0%). AAA was positively associated with older age and negatively associated with diabetes. The visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio was not significantly associated with AAA after adjustment for other risk factors. Patients with a visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio in quartile four had a 1.63-fold increased risk of AAA but with wide confidence intervals (95% CI 0.71–3.70; p=0.248). Visceral adiposity was not associated with AAA growth. In conclusion, this study suggests that visceral adiposity is not specifically associated with AAA presence or growth although larger studies are required to confirm these findings.
Keyword Abdominal aortic aneurysm
Adiposity
Obesity
Visceral
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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