Sensorimotor function, balance abilities and pain influence Timed Up and Go performance in older community-living people

Kwan, Marcella Mun-San, Lin, Sang-I, Chen, Ching-Huey, Close, Jacqueline C. T. and Lord, Stephen R. (2011) Sensorimotor function, balance abilities and pain influence Timed Up and Go performance in older community-living people. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 23 3: 196-201. doi:10.1007/BF03324960


Author Kwan, Marcella Mun-San
Lin, Sang-I
Chen, Ching-Huey
Close, Jacqueline C. T.
Lord, Stephen R.
Title Sensorimotor function, balance abilities and pain influence Timed Up and Go performance in older community-living people
Journal name Aging Clinical and Experimental Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1594-0667
1720-8319
Publication date 2011-06-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF03324960
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 23
Issue 3
Start page 196
End page 201
Total pages 6
Place of publication Milan, Italy
Publisher Editrice Kurtis
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background and aims: The Timed up and Go Test (TUG) is recommended as a screening tool for fall risk in older people. It is assumed that this general mobility test is underpinned by physiological factors such as strength, coordination and balance. However, no studies have examined the range of physiological and psychological factors which influence performance on this test. The aim of this study was to examine the relative contributions of a range of sensorimotor, balance and psychological factors to TUG performance in a large sample of older people. Methods: 280 community-dwelling people aged 65 plus years (mean age 74.9, SD=6.4) underwent the TUG test, as well as quantitative tests of vision, peripheral sensation, strength, reaction time, balance, fear of falling, pain and vitality. Results: The time required to complete the TUG was significantly related to limitations in instrumental activities of daily living and fear of falling. Many physiological and psychological factors were significantly associated with TUG performance in univariate analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analyses identified knee strength, postural sway, reaction time, edge contrast sensitivity, MMSE score, SF12 body pain and general health scores, number of medical conditions and age as significant and independent predictors of TUG performance. Of these measures, the lower limb strength measure explained most variance in TUG times. However, other sensorimotor, balance, psychological and health measures provided important independent information. The combined set of variables explained 43.5% of the variance in TUG times (multiple r=0.65). Conclusions: Findings indicate that, in community-dwelling older people, TUG performance is influenced by lower limb strength, balance, reaction time, vision and pain, in addition to cognitive function and health status.
Keyword Affect
Balance
Elderly
Lower limb strength
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID NSC 96-2516-S-006-003
D96-1100
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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