'The pure hard slog that nursing is...': a qualitative analysis of the nature of nursing work

Bogossian, Fiona, Winters-Chang, Peta and Tuckett, Anthony (2014) 'The pure hard slog that nursing is...': a qualitative analysis of the nature of nursing work. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 46 5: 377-388. doi:10.1111/jnu.12090


Author Bogossian, Fiona
Winters-Chang, Peta
Tuckett, Anthony
Title 'The pure hard slog that nursing is...': a qualitative analysis of the nature of nursing work
Journal name Journal of Nursing Scholarship   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1527-6546
1547-5069
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jnu.12090
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 5
Start page 377
End page 388
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract Purpose To explore nurses' perceptions of the nature of nursing work as a factor that contributes to attrition from the profession. Design A nonpurposive sample of nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-cohort Study in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom provided electronic responses about reasons for leaving the profession. Data were then subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings Nurses at the coal face, that is, those who actually do the work of nursing, in real working conditions, express dissatisfaction in relation to hygiene factors relating to the nature of nursing work and attribute these to nurses leaving the profession: workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration. Conclusions Nurses' satisfaction with work and motivation to work are being sorely tested. There is manifest tension between the core concepts of nursingcompassion and careand a system of work that actively precludes nurses from being able to exhibit these virtues and fails to reward them. Workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration are drivers of attrition and need to be addressed. Clinical Relevance Implications from this study are fourfold: determination of nursing workload, mitigating the impact of shift work, providing safe work environments, and adequate financial remuneration.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: To explore nurses' perceptions of the nature of nursing work as a factor that contributes to attrition from the profession.

Design: A nonpurposive sample of nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-cohort Study in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom provided electronic responses about reasons for leaving the profession. Data were then subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Findings: Nurses at the “coal face,” that is, those who actually do the work of nursing, in real working conditions, express dissatisfaction in relation to hygiene factors relating to the nature of nursing work and attribute these to nurses leaving the profession: workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration.

Conclusions: Nurses’ satisfaction with work and motivation to work are being sorely tested. There is manifest tension between the core concepts of nursing—compassion and care—and a system of work that actively precludes nurses from being able to exhibit these virtues and fails to reward them. Workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration are drivers of attrition and need to be addressed.

Clinical Relevance: Implications from this study are fourfold: determination of nursing workload, mitigating the impact of shift work, providing safe work environments, and adequate financial remuneration.
Keyword Nursing
Workload
Violence
Remuneration
Shift work
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID LP0562102
2005002108
456163
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 29 Jul 2014, 21:57:32 EST by Amy Spence on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work