Phenotypic plasticity of spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus) and longfruited primrose-willow (Ludwigia octovalvis) in response to rice interference

Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh and Abugho, Seth Bernard (2012) Phenotypic plasticity of spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus) and longfruited primrose-willow (Ludwigia octovalvis) in response to rice interference. Weed Science, 60 3: 411-415. doi:10.1614/WS-D-11-00158.1


Author Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh
Abugho, Seth Bernard
Title Phenotypic plasticity of spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus) and longfruited primrose-willow (Ludwigia octovalvis) in response to rice interference
Journal name Weed Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1745
1550-2759
Publication date 2012-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1614/WS-D-11-00158.1
Volume 60
Issue 3
Start page 411
End page 415
Total pages 5
Place of publication Lawrence, KS United States
Publisher Weed Science Society of America
Language eng
Subject 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
1110 Nursing
Abstract The growth of spiny amaranth and longfruited primrose-willow was studied by growing them alone and in competition with 4 and 12 rice (cv. RC222) plants. Interference with 12 rice plants reduced the height of spiny amaranth beyond 6 wk after planting. The height of longfruited primrose-willow was significantly reduced by the crop interference starting from 4 wk after planting. Both weed species showed the ability to reduce the effects of rice interference by increasing leaf area, leaf and stem biomass in the upper half of the plant, and specific stem length. At 9 wk after planting, for example, longfruited primrose-willow had 89 and 99% leaf biomass in the upper half of the plant when grown with 4 and 12 rice plants compared with only 34% when grown alone. These values for spiny amaranth were 15, 29, and 72% when grown alone, with 4 rice plants, and 12 rice plants, respectively. Despite such plasticity, spiny amaranth's aboveground biomass at final harvest was reduced by 34 and 70% when grown with 4 and 12 rice plants, respectively, compared with its biomass without crop interference. The corresponding values for longfruited primrose-willow were 92 and 98%, respectively. These results suggest that uniform and high crop density could be an important tool to reduce competition from these weeds in direct-seeded rice.
Keyword Biomass
Crop interference
Direct seeded rice
Leaf area
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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