Ecological studies on Echinochloa crus-galli and the implications for weed management in direct-seeded rice

Chauhan, B. S. and Johnson, D. E. (2011) Ecological studies on Echinochloa crus-galli and the implications for weed management in direct-seeded rice. Crop Protection, 30 11: 1385-1391. doi:10.1016/j.cropro.2011.07.013


Author Chauhan, B. S.
Johnson, D. E.
Title Ecological studies on Echinochloa crus-galli and the implications for weed management in direct-seeded rice
Journal name Crop Protection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0261-2194
1873-6904
Publication date 2011-01-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cropro.2011.07.013
Volume 30
Issue 11
Start page 1385
End page 1391
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
Abstract Echinochloa crus-galli, a C4 grass, is one of the world's most serious weeds. Weed management decisions for this species can be derived from knowledge of its seed biology. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of light on germination; seed burial depth and rice residue on emergence and growth; and flooding time and depth on emergence, survival and growth of this species. Light stimulated seed germination but it was not an absolute requirement for germination. The proportion of seeds germinating was greatest for seeds placed on the soil surface (92%), and emergence declined with increasing burial depth in soil; no seedlings emerged from the depth of 8cm. A burial depth of only 0.4cm reduced seedling emergence by 50%. Seedling emergence and seedling biomass were reduced by the addition of high level (6tonha-1) of rice residue to the soil surface. Early and deep flooding significantly suppressed growth of E. crus-galli seedlings. In flooded conditions, with increased water depth the weed allocated more biomass to shoots at the expense of roots. The information gained from this study could contribute to improve weed control approaches. Soil inversion by tillage to bury weed seeds below their maximum depth of emergence, use of crop residue as mulch and early flooding of the crop could serve as important tools for managing E. crus-galli and other weed species with similar germination requirements. These management options, however, would need to be compatible with other crop management requirements.
Keyword Asia
Burial depth
Crop residue
Echinochloa crus galli
Flooding
Seedling emergence
Weed ecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 34 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 12 Jul 2014, 04:52:47 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Plant Science