Influence of environmental factors on the germination of urena lobata L. and its response to herbicides

Awan, Tahir Hussain, Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh and Sta Cruz, Pompe C. (2014) Influence of environmental factors on the germination of urena lobata L. and its response to herbicides. PLoS ONE, 9 3: e90305.1-e90305.8. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090305


Author Awan, Tahir Hussain
Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh
Sta Cruz, Pompe C.
Title Influence of environmental factors on the germination of urena lobata L. and its response to herbicides
Formatted title
 Influence of environmental factors on the germination of urena lobata L. and its response to herbicides
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-03-21
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0090305
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page e90305.1
End page e90305.8
Total pages 8
Place of publication San Francisco United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Urena lobata is becoming a noxious and invasive weed in rangelands, pastures, and undisturbed areas in the Philippines. This study determined the effects of seed scarification, light, salt and water stress, amount of rice residue, and seed burial depth on seed germination and emergence of U. lobata; and evaluated the weed's response to post-emergence herbicides. Germination was stimulated by both mechanical and chemical seed scarifications. The combination of the two scarification methods provided maximum (99%) seed germination. Germination was slightly stimulated when seeds were placed in light (65%) compared with when seeds were kept in the dark (46%). Sodium chloride concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 mM and osmotic potential ranging from 0 to -1.6 MPa affected the germination of U. lobata seeds significantly. The osmotic potential required for 50% inhibition of the maximum germination was -0.1 MPa; however, some seeds germinated at -0.8 MPa, but none germinated at -1.6 MPa. Seedling emergence and biomass increased with increase in rice residue amount up to 4 t ha-1, but declined beyond this amount. Soil surface placement of weed seeds resulted in the highest seedling emergence (84%), which declined with increase in burial depth. The burial depth required for 50% inhibition of maximum emergence was 2 cm; emergence was greatly reduced (93%) at burial depth of 4 cm or more. Weed seedling biomass also decreased with increase in burial depth. Bispyribac-sodium, a commonly used herbicide in rice, sprayed at the 4-leaf stage of the weed, provided 100% control, which did not differ much with 2,4-D (98%), glyphosate (97%), and thiobencarb + 2,4-D (98%). These herbicides reduced shoot and root biomass by 99-100%.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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