Impact of an undergraduate course on medical students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices

Crowley, Jennifer, Ball, Lauren, Leveritt , Michael D., Arroll, Bruce, Han, Dug Yeo and Wall, Clare (2014) Impact of an undergraduate course on medical students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices. Journal of Primary Health Care, 6 2: 101-107.

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Author Crowley, Jennifer
Ball, Lauren
Leveritt , Michael D.
Arroll, Bruce
Han, Dug Yeo
Wall, Clare
Title Impact of an undergraduate course on medical students' self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices
Journal name Journal of Primary Health Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1172-6156
1172-6164
Publication date 2014-06-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 6
Issue 2
Start page 101
End page 107
Total pages 7
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publisher Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
Language eng
Formatted abstract
INTRODUCTION: Doctors are increasingly involved in the management of chronic disease and counsel patients about their lifestyle behaviours, including nutrition, to improve their health outcomes.

AIM: This study aimed to assess the impact of a medical undergraduate course containing nutrition content on medical students’ self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices.

METHODS: A total of 239 medical students enrolled in a 12-week nutrition-related course at The University of Auckland were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire before and after the course. The questionnaire was adapted from a previous evaluation of a preventive medicine and nutrition course at Harvard Medical School.

RESULTS: Sixty-one medical students completed both pre- and post-course questionnaires (25.5%). At baseline, medical students described their eating habits to be more healthy than non-medical students (p=0.0261). Post-course, medical students reported a higher frequency of wholegrain food intake (p=0.0229). Medical students also reported being less comfortable making nutrition recommendations to family and friends post-course (p=0.008). Most medical students (63.9%) perceived increased awareness of their own dietary choices, and some (15.3%) reported an increased likelihood to counsel patients on
lifestyle behaviour post-course.

DISCUSSION: Students can increase awareness of their own nutrition behaviour after undertaking a course that includes nutrition in the initial phase of their medical degree. Further investigation of how medical students’ confidence to provide nutrition advice evolves throughout their training and in future practice is required.
Keyword Exercise
Health behavior
Medical education
Nutritional sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Jun 2014, 12:44:09 EST by System User on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences