Cross-sectional relationships between dyadic coping and anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction for patients with prostate cancer and their spouses

Regan, Tim W., Lambert, Sylvie D., Kelly, Brian, McElduff, Patrick, Girgis, Afaf, Kayser, Karen and Turner, Jane (2014) Cross-sectional relationships between dyadic coping and anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction for patients with prostate cancer and their spouses. Patient Education and Counseling, 96 1: 120-127. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2014.04.010


Author Regan, Tim W.
Lambert, Sylvie D.
Kelly, Brian
McElduff, Patrick
Girgis, Afaf
Kayser, Karen
Turner, Jane
Title Cross-sectional relationships between dyadic coping and anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction for patients with prostate cancer and their spouses
Journal name Patient Education and Counseling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-5134
0738-3991
Publication date 2014-07-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2014.04.010
Volume 96
Issue 1
Start page 120
End page 127
Total pages 8
Place of publication Shannon, County Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
Dyadic coping has an impact on couples’ adjustment to breast cancer; however, there is limited evidence regarding whether dyadic coping influences couples’ adjustment to other types of cancer. The objective of this analysis was to further our knowledge of the relationships between dyadic coping, anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction among couples facing prostate cancer.

Methods
Forty-two men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer recruited from urology clinics and their spouses completed measures of dyadic coping, anxiety, depression, and relationship satisfaction. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used to examine the relationships among these concepts.

Results
Relationship satisfaction was significantly associated with patients’ and wives’ use of positive and negative dyadic coping, and their partners’ use of these strategies. Although patients’ and wives’ use of supportive dyadic coping was not associated with their anxiety and depression, their partner's use of this strategy was associated with anxiety and depression. Only husbands’ and wives’ perceptions of their partner's negative dyadic coping was associated with anxiety and depression.

Conclusions/Practice implications
Couples respond to a prostate cancer diagnosis as an interactional system. Future research should focus on tailoring couple-based interventions such that patients and spouses are equipped to provide the specific support their partners need.
Keyword Dyadic coping
Couples
Prostate cancer
Distress
Relationships
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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