Infant feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs predict antenatal intention among first-time mothers in Queensland

Newby, Ruth, Brodribb, Wendy, Ware, Robert S. and Davies, Peter S.W. (2014) Infant feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs predict antenatal intention among first-time mothers in Queensland. Breastfeeding Medicine, 9 5: 266-272. doi:10.1089/bfm.2014.0012


Author Newby, Ruth
Brodribb, Wendy
Ware, Robert S.
Davies, Peter S.W.
Title Infant feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs predict antenatal intention among first-time mothers in Queensland
Journal name Breastfeeding Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-8253
1556-8342
Publication date 2014-06-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/bfm.2014.0012
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 5
Start page 266
End page 272
Total pages 7
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert Inc.
Language eng
Subject 2729 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
2913 Maternity and Midwifery
2919 Pediatrics
2719 Health Policy
Abstract Aim: This study assessed infant feeding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among women from Queensland, Australia, in their first pregnancy. Antenatal feeding intention in this group was described, and the hypothesis was tested that antenatal knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about infant feeding are associated with antenatal intention for the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding for the infant's first year. Subjects and Methods: The Feeding Queensland Babies Study is a prospective survey of infant feeding attitudes and behaviors among first-time mothers in Queensland, Australia. Data on infant feeding knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and intention were collected antenatally, and an Infant Feeding Attitudes Score was calculated. Results: Although 85% of respondents endorsed breastfeeding as most appropriate for infants, 11% valued formula feeding equally. Intention to give any breastmilk during the first weeks was 98%, but it fell to 18% during the second year. More than one-quarter of women reported intention to introduce foods other than breastmilk before 5 months of infant age. The infant feeding attitudes and beliefs score correlated positively with feeding intention for breastfeeding and the introduction of complementary solids. Conclusions: Enhancing women's knowledge of recommendations and their understanding of breastfeeding's specific benefits and the reasons for recommended scheduling of feeding transitions may positively impact breastfeeding exclusivity and duration and the age-appropriate introduction of complementary solids. Communication of detailed feeding recommendations for the infant's first year and specific information about the health benefits of breastfeeding should be a goal of healthcare providers working with pregnant women.
Keyword Obstetrics & Gynecology
Pediatrics
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Pediatrics
OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
PEDIATRICS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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