Whole-body vibration exposure of haul truck drivers at a surface coal mine

Wolfgang, Rebecca and Burgess-Limerick, Robin (2014) Whole-body vibration exposure of haul truck drivers at a surface coal mine. Applied Ergonomics, 45 6: 1700-1704. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2014.05.020

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Author Wolfgang, Rebecca
Burgess-Limerick, Robin
Title Whole-body vibration exposure of haul truck drivers at a surface coal mine
Journal name Applied Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-6870
1872-9126
Publication date 2014-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2014.05.020
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 45
Issue 6
Start page 1700
End page 1704
Total pages 5
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject 3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Abstract Haul truck drivers at surface mines are exposed to whole-body vibration for extended periods. Thirty-two whole-body vibration measurements were gathered from haul trucks under a range of normal operating conditions. Measurements taken from 30 of the 32 trucks fell within the health guidance caution zone defined by ISO2631-1 for an 8 h daily exposure suggesting, according to ISO2631-1, that "caution with respect to potential health risks is indicated". Maintained roadways were associated with substantially lower vibration amplitudes. Larger trucks were associated with lower vibration levels than small trucks. The descriptive nature of the research, and small sample size, prevents any strong conclusion regarding causal links. Further investigation of the variables associated with elevated vibration levels is justified. Relevance to industry: The operators of mining equipment such as haul trucks are exposed to whole-body vibration amplitudes which have potential to lead to long term health effects. Systematic whole-body vibration measurements taken at frequent intervals are required to provide an understanding of the causes of elevated vibration levels and hence determine appropriate control measures.
Formatted abstract
Haul truck drivers at surface mines are exposed to whole-body vibration for extended periods. Thirty-two whole-body vibration measurements were gathered from haul trucks under a range of normal operating conditions. Measurements taken from 30 of the 32 trucks fell within the health guidance caution zone defined by ISO2631-1 for an 8 h daily exposure suggesting, according to ISO2631-1, that “caution with respect to potential health risks is indicated”. Maintained roadways were associated with substantially lower vibration amplitudes. Larger trucks were associated with lower vibration levels than small trucks. The descriptive nature of the research, and small sample size, prevents any strong conclusion regarding causal links. Further investigation of the variables associated with elevated vibration levels is justified.

Relevance to industry

The operators of mining equipment such as haul trucks are exposed to whole-body vibration amplitudes which have potential to lead to long term health effects. Systematic whole-body vibration measurements taken at frequent intervals are required to provide an understanding of the causes of elevated vibration levels and hence determine appropriate control measures.
Keyword Whole-body vibration
Mining
Haul truck
ISO2631-1
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 21 June 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 23 Jun 2014, 20:18:35 EST by Dr Robin Burgess-limerick on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre