Comparing population attributable risks for heart disease across the adult lifespan in women

Brown, Wendy J., Pavey, Toby and Bauman, Adrian (2015) Comparing population attributable risks for heart disease across the adult lifespan in women. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 49 16: 1069-1076. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-093090


Author Brown, Wendy J.
Pavey, Toby
Bauman, Adrian
Title Comparing population attributable risks for heart disease across the adult lifespan in women
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-3674
1473-0480
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093090
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 16
Start page 1069
End page 1076
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Abstract Background Recent estimates suggest that high body mass index (BMI), smoking, high blood pressure (BP) and physical inactivity are leading risk factors for the overall burden of disease in Australia. The aim was to examine the population attributable risk (PAR) of heart disease for each of these risk factors, across the adult lifespan in Australian women.
Formatted abstract
Background: Recent estimates suggest that high body mass index (BMI), smoking, high blood pressure (BP) and physical inactivity are leading risk factors for the overall burden of disease in Australia. The aim was to examine the population attributable risk (PAR) of heart disease for each of these risk factors, across the adult lifespan in Australian women.

Methods: PARs were estimated using relative risks (RRs) for each of the four risk factors, as used in the Global Burden of Disease Study, and prevalence estimates from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, in 15 age groups from 22–27 (N=9608) to 85–90 (N=3901).

Results: RRs and prevalence estimates varied across the lifespan. RRs ranged from 6.15 for smoking in the younger women to 1.20 for high BMI and high BP in the older women. Prevalence of risk exposure ranged from 2% for high BP in the younger women to 79% for high BMI in mid-age women. In young adult women up to age 30, the highest population risk was attributed to smoking. From age 31 to 90, PARs were highest for physical inactivity.

Conclusions: From about age 30, the population risk of heart disease attributable to inactivity outweighs that of other risk factors, including high BMI. Programmes for the promotion and maintenance of physical activity deserve to be a much higher public health priority for women than they are now, across the adult lifespan. 
Keyword Sport Sciences
Sport Sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 569940
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 8 May 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 21 Jun 2014, 03:03:03 EST by Toby Pavey on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences