Climate variability, social and environmental factors, and Ross River virus transmission: research development and future research needs

Tong, Shilu, Dale, Pat, Nicholls, Neville, Mackenzie, John S., Wolff, Rodney and McMichael, Anthony J. (2008) Climate variability, social and environmental factors, and Ross River virus transmission: research development and future research needs. Environmental Health Perspectives, 116 12: 1591-1597. doi:10.1289/ehp.11680


Author Tong, Shilu
Dale, Pat
Nicholls, Neville
Mackenzie, John S.
Wolff, Rodney
McMichael, Anthony J.
Title Climate variability, social and environmental factors, and Ross River virus transmission: research development and future research needs
Journal name Environmental Health Perspectives   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-6765
1552-9924
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1289/ehp.11680
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 116
Issue 12
Start page 1591
End page 1597
Total pages 7
Place of publication Triangle Park, NC, United States
Publisher U.S. Department of Health and Human Services * National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Arbovirus diseases have emerged as a global public health concern. However, the impact of climatic, social, and environmental variability on the transmission of arbovirus diseases remains to be determined.

Objective:
Our goal for this study was to provide an overview of research development and future research directions about the interrelationship between climate variability, social and environmental factors, and the transmission of Ross River virus (RRV), the most common and widespread arbovirus disease in Australia.

Methods:
We conducted a systematic literature search on climatic, social, and environmental factors and RRV disease. Potentially relevant studies were identified from a series of electronic searches.

Results:
The body of evidence revealed that the transmission cycles of RRV disease appear to be sensitive to climate and tidal variability. Rainfall, temperature, and high tides were among major determinants of the transmission of RRV disease at the macro level. However, the nature and magnitude of the interrelationship between climate variability, mosquito density, and the transmission of RRV disease varied with geographic area and socioenvironmental condition. Projected anthropogenic global climatic change may result in an increase in RRV infections, and the key determinants of RRV transmission we have identified here may be useful in the development of an early warning system.

Conclusions:
The analysis indicates that there is a complex relationship between climate variability, social and environmental factors, and RRV transmission. Different strategies may be needed for the control and prevention of RRV disease at different levels. These research findings could be used as an additional tool to support decision making in disease control/surveillance and risk management.
Keyword Climate variability
Early warning system
Ross River virus transmission
Social and environmental factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: W.H. Bryan Mining Geology Research Centre
 
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Created: Wed, 18 Jun 2014, 01:12:16 EST by Rodney Wolff on behalf of WH Bryan Mining and Geology Centre