Lesion symptom mapping of manipulable object naming in nonfluent aphasia: can a brain be both embodied and disembodied?

Reilly, Jamie, Harnish, Stacy, Garcia, Amanda, Hung, Jinyi, Rodriguez, Amy D. and Crosson, Bruce (2014) Lesion symptom mapping of manipulable object naming in nonfluent aphasia: can a brain be both embodied and disembodied?. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 31 4: 287-312. doi:10.1080/02643294.2014.914022


Author Reilly, Jamie
Harnish, Stacy
Garcia, Amanda
Hung, Jinyi
Rodriguez, Amy D.
Crosson, Bruce
Title Lesion symptom mapping of manipulable object naming in nonfluent aphasia: can a brain be both embodied and disembodied?
Journal name Cognitive Neuropsychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-0627
0264-3294
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02643294.2014.914022
Volume 31
Issue 4
Start page 287
End page 312
Total pages 26
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Embodied cognition offers an approach to word meaning firmly grounded in action and perception. A strong prediction of embodied cognition is that sensorimotor simulation is a necessary component of lexical–semantic representation. One semantic distinction where motor imagery is likely to play a key role involves the representation of manufactured artefacts. Many questions remain with respect to the scope of embodied cognition. One dominant unresolved issue is the extent to which motor enactment is necessary for representing and generating words with high motor salience. We investigated lesion correlates of manipulable relative to nonmanipulable name generation (e.g., name a school supply; name a mountain range) in patients with nonfluent aphasia (N = 14). Lesion volumes within motor (BA4, where BA = Brodmann area) and premotor (BA6) cortices were not predictive of category discrepancies. Lesion symptom mapping linked impairment for manipulable objects to polymodal convergence zones and to projections of the left, primary visual cortex specialized for motion perception (MT/V5+). Lesions to motor and premotor cortex were not predictive of manipulability impairment. This lesion correlation is incompatible with an embodied perspective premised on necessity of motor cortex for the enactment and subsequent production of motor-related words. These findings instead support a graded or “soft” approach to embodied cognition premised on an ancillary role of modality-specific cortical regions in enriching modality-neutral representations. We discuss a dynamic, hybrid approach to the neurobiology of semantic memory integrating both embodied and disembodied components.
Keyword Semantic memory
Aphasia
Lesion correlation
Category specificity
Embodied cognition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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