Genetic diversity and biogeography of the boab Adansonia gregorii (Malvaceae: Bombacoideae)

Bell, Karen L., Rangan, Haripriya, Fowler, Rachael, Kull, Christian A., Pettigrew, J. D., Vickers, Claudia E. and Murphy, Daniel J. (2014) Genetic diversity and biogeography of the boab Adansonia gregorii (Malvaceae: Bombacoideae). Australian Journal of Botany, 62 2: 164-174. doi:10.1071/BT13209


Author Bell, Karen L.
Rangan, Haripriya
Fowler, Rachael
Kull, Christian A.
Pettigrew, J. D.
Vickers, Claudia E.
Murphy, Daniel J.
Title Genetic diversity and biogeography of the boab Adansonia gregorii (Malvaceae: Bombacoideae)
Formatted title
Genetic diversity and biogeography of the boab Adansonia gregorii (Malvaceae: Bombacoideae)

Journal name Australian Journal of Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-9862
0067-1924
Publication date 2014-05-22
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/BT13209
Volume 62
Issue 2
Start page 164
End page 174
Total pages 11
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The Kimberley region of Western Australia is recognised for its high biodiversity and many endemic species, including the charismatic boab tree, Adansonia gregorii F.Muell. (Malvaceae: Bombacoideae). In order to assess the effects of biogeographic barriers on A. gregorii, we examined the genetic diversity and population structure of the tree species across its range in the Kimberley and adjacent areas to the east. Genetic variation at six microsatellite loci in 220 individuals from the entire species range was examined. Five weakly divergent populations, separated by west–east and coast–inland divides, were distinguished using spatial principal components analysis. However, the predominant pattern was low geographic structure and high gene flow. Coalescent analysis detected a population bottleneck and significant gene flow across these inferred biogeographic divides. Climate cycles and coastline changes following the last glacial maximum are implicated in decreases in ancient A. gregorii population size. Of all the potential gene flow vectors, various macropod species and humans are the most likely.
Keyword Australian monsoon tropics
Baobab
Dispersal
Gene flow
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP1093100
VR0165
Institutional Status UQ

 
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