Adverse prenatal environment and kidney development: Implications for programing of adult disease

Dorey, Emily S., Pantaleon, Marie, Weir, Kristy A. and Moritz, Karen M. (2014) Adverse prenatal environment and kidney development: Implications for programing of adult disease. Reproduction, 147 6: R189-R198. doi:10.1530/REP-13-0478


Author Dorey, Emily S.
Pantaleon, Marie
Weir, Kristy A.
Moritz, Karen M.
Title Adverse prenatal environment and kidney development: Implications for programing of adult disease
Journal name Reproduction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1470-1626
1741-7899
Publication date 2014-06-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1530/REP-13-0478
Volume 147
Issue 6
Start page R189
End page R198
Total pages 10
Place of publication Woodlands, Bristol, United Kingdom
Publisher BioScientifica
Language eng
Abstract The 'developmental origins of health and disease' hypothesis suggests that many adult-onset diseases can be attributed to altered growth and development during early life. Perturbations during gestation can be detrimental and lead to an increased risk of developing renal, cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurocognitive dysfunction in adulthood. The kidney has emerged as being especially vulnerable to insult at almost any stage of development resulting in a reduction in nephron endowment. In both humans and animal models, a reduction in nephron endowment is strongly associated with an increased risk of hypertension. The focus of this review is twofold: i) to determine the importance of specific periods during development on long-term programing and ii) to examine the effects of maternal perturbations on the developing kidney and how this may program adult-onset disease. Recent evidence has suggested that insults occurring around the time of conception also have the capacity to influence long-term health. Although epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in mediating these outcomes, it is unclear as to how these may impact on kidney development. This presents exciting new challenges and areas for research.
Keyword Developmental Biology
Reproductive Biology
Developmental Biology
Reproductive Biology
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 1046137
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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