The probable role of cannibalism in spreading Trichinella papuae infection in a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea

Owen, Ifor L., Awui, Columba, Langelet, Eric, Soctine, Wenda and Reid, Simon (2014) The probable role of cannibalism in spreading Trichinella papuae infection in a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea. Veterinary Parasitology, 203 3-4: 335-338. doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.008

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Author Owen, Ifor L.
Awui, Columba
Langelet, Eric
Soctine, Wenda
Reid, Simon
Title The probable role of cannibalism in spreading Trichinella papuae infection in a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea
Formatted title
The probable role of cannibalism in spreading Trichinella papuae infection in a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea
Journal name Veterinary Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-2550
0304-4017
Publication date 2014-07-14
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.008
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 203
Issue 3-4
Start page 335
End page 338
Total pages 4
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Between 2003 and 2007, 83 (50%) of 167 crocodiles ( Crocodylus porosus) purchased as juveniles by a crocodile farm 3 or 4 years earlier from Kikori, Gulf Province, were found to be infected with Trichinella papuae. Between 2005 and 2007 infection was detected in a number of crocodiles at the farm obtained from six localities other than Kikori, as well as in a few animals born on the farm. Up to 2004, all juveniles at the farm, whether wild- or farm-born, were penned together; the practice was then stopped to prevent possible infection through cannibalism. The last infected animal from Kikori was seen in 2007, 4 years after the purchase of crocodiles from there ceased. The last non-Kikori infected crocodile was seen, also, in 2007. None of the 1972 crocodiles (comprising wild- and farm-born animals) tested from 2008 to 2013, using the digestion method, was infected with T. papuae. This indicates that infection of non-Kikori crocodiles was the result of cannibalism within the farm during the years up to 2004 when juvenile crocodiles were kept together, and that the farm is now free of the infection. 
Keyword Cannibalism
Crocodile farm management
Crocodylus porosus
Trichinella papuae
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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