Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in pigs and their in-contact humans in Southeast Queensland, Australia, and Cambodia

Wang, Wenqi, Owen, Helen, Traub, Rebecca J., Cuttell, Leigh, Inpankaew, Tawin and Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle (2014) Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in pigs and their in-contact humans in Southeast Queensland, Australia, and Cambodia. Veterinary Parasitology, 203 3-4: 264-269. doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.006


Author Wang, Wenqi
Owen, Helen
Traub, Rebecca J.
Cuttell, Leigh
Inpankaew, Tawin
Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle
Title Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in pigs and their in-contact humans in Southeast Queensland, Australia, and Cambodia
Formatted title
Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in pigs and their in-contact humans in Southeast Queensland, Australia, and Cambodia
Journal name Veterinary Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-2550
0304-4017
Publication date 2014-07-14
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.006
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 203
Issue 3-4
Start page 264
End page 269
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Blastocystis, an intestinal protist commonly found in humans and animals worldwide, has been implicated by some as a causative agent in irritable bowel syndrome in humans. In pigs, infection with Blastocystis is commonly reported, with most pigs shown to harbour subtypes (ST) 1 or 5, suggesting that these animals are potentially natural hosts for Blastocystis. Although ST5 is considered rare in humans, it has been reported to be a potential zoonosis from pigs in rural China. To test these hypotheses, we conducted molecular analysis of faecal samples from pigs and in-contact humans from commercial intensive piggeries in Southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia, and a village in rural Cambodia. The prevalence of Blastocystis in SEQ and Cambodian pigs was 76.7% and 45.2%, respectively, with all positive pigs harbouring ST5. It appears likely that pigs are natural hosts of Blastocystis with a high prevalence of ST5 that is presumably the pig-adapted ST in these regions. Amongst the SEQ piggery staff, 83.3% were Blastocystis carriers in contrast to only 55.2% of Cambodian villagers. The predominant STs found in humans were STs 1, 2 (Cambodia only) and 3. Interestingly, ST5 which is usually rare in humans was present in the SEQ piggery staff but not in the Cambodian villagers. We conclude that in intensive piggeries, close contact between pigs and their handlers may increase the risks of zoonotic transmission of Blastocystis.
Keyword Blastocystis
Pig
Epidemiology
Zoonosis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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