Parasite surveys and environmental management for prevention of parasitic infection in cultivated Barbonymus gonionotus (Cyprinidae) in fishponds, in an opisthorchiasis endemic area of northeast Thailand

Tesana, Smarn, Thabsripair, Pairat, Suwannatrai, Apiporn, Haruay, Surat, Piratae, Supawadee, Khampoosa, Panita, Thammasiri, Chalida, Prasopdee, Sattrachai, Kulsantiwong, Jutharat, Chalorkpunrut, Prapart and Jones, Malcolm K. (2014) Parasite surveys and environmental management for prevention of parasitic infection in cultivated Barbonymus gonionotus (Cyprinidae) in fishponds, in an opisthorchiasis endemic area of northeast Thailand. Aquaculture, 428 54-60. doi:10.1016/j.aquaculture.2014.02.031


Author Tesana, Smarn
Thabsripair, Pairat
Suwannatrai, Apiporn
Haruay, Surat
Piratae, Supawadee
Khampoosa, Panita
Thammasiri, Chalida
Prasopdee, Sattrachai
Kulsantiwong, Jutharat
Chalorkpunrut, Prapart
Jones, Malcolm K.
Title Parasite surveys and environmental management for prevention of parasitic infection in cultivated Barbonymus gonionotus (Cyprinidae) in fishponds, in an opisthorchiasis endemic area of northeast Thailand
Journal name Aquaculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0044-8486
1873-5622
Publication date 2014-05-20
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2014.02.031
Volume 428
Start page 54
End page 60
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Snails and fishes from ponds in an area endemic for human liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) in Khon Kaen Province, northeast Thailand, were surveyed for the presence of zoonotic helminth parasites during May–November 2007. The surveys were performed to obtain information on the potential for transmission of these parasites to fish cultivated for human consumption. Sixteen species/subspecies of snails from 7 families and 14 species of fish from 6 families were collected for parasitological examination. Four species of snails were found to be infected with a range of trematode species. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos, the first intermediate host of O. viverrini, was the most commonly infected with trematodes, with a prevalence of infection of 1.69–25.00% in 10 ponds. O. viverrini was found in 1 of 1065 (0.09%) B. siamensis goniomphalos individuals examined in one pond. Metacercariae of Echinostoma revolutum, another agent of human infection, was found in the snail Idiopoma umbilicata in one pond. The fish Luciosoma bleekeri was infected with the trematode Centrocestus caninus in one pond. An environmental management trial was conducted in selected ponds in the endemic area to measure the effects of exclusion of snails and thus trematode parasites. After modifications to the ponds and boundaries, including the exclusion of snails, the ponds were stocked with Barbonymus gonionotus fingerlings. Batches of the fingerlings from the same nursery farm were determined to be free of parasites prior to their introduction to the ponds. The experimental ponds were examined monthly for the presence of snails. Fish were also sampled monthly for parasites. After 8 months, fish grown in environmentally managed ponds were larger than those of the control pond. However, fish in all ponds were found to be infected with the trematode Haplorchis taichui. The source of this zoonotic species is uncertain and will require further investigation and potential environmental management, both at farms and at hatcheries.
Keyword Aquaculture
Fish pond
Barbonymus gonionotus
Snail intermediate host
Fish intermediate host
Environmental management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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