Signalling function of long wavelength colours during agonistic male-male interactions in the wrasse Coris julis

Braun, Christoph, Michiels, Nico K., Siebeck, Ulrike E. and Sprenger, Dennis (2014) Signalling function of long wavelength colours during agonistic male-male interactions in the wrasse Coris julis. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 504 277-286. doi:10.3354/meps10760


Author Braun, Christoph
Michiels, Nico K.
Siebeck, Ulrike E.
Sprenger, Dennis
Title Signalling function of long wavelength colours during agonistic male-male interactions in the wrasse Coris julis
Formatted title
Signalling function of long wavelength colours during agonistic male-male interactions in the wrasse Coris julis
Journal name Marine Ecology Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Publication date 2014-05-14
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps10760
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 504
Start page 277
End page 286
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oldenburg, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Long wavelength colours (λ > 580 nm) often serve as visual signals during inter- and intrasexual interactions in various species of freshwater fish. However, while long wavelength colours are also prevalent in many marine fish, their functional importance remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of long wavelength colours mediate intraspecific aggressive interactions in the Mediterranean rainbow wrasse Coris julis. By manipulating the relative mixture of red (λmax = 628 nm) and blue (λmax = 454 nm) light in experimental tanks, we created conditions in which discrimination of long wavelength colours from colours of shorter wavelength was either possible or prevented. We found that resident males were significantly more likely to attack conspecific intruder males when discrimination was enabled compared to conditions where no such discrimination was possible. Aggression from residents was associated with the display of a red (λmax = 611 nm) colour patch on the dorsal fin of intruders, but not the size of the putative signal. Our findings suggest that long wavelength colours are an important component of marine visual ecology by mediating agonistic male-male interactions.
Keyword Behaviour
Colour signals
Labrid
Visual ecology
Red collared widowbirds
False discovery rate
Female mate choice
Reef fish
Wave sensitivity
Sexual selection
Male coloration
Behavior
Sticklebacks
Communication
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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