Concinnocotyla (Monogenea: Polystomatidae), a new genus for the polystome from the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri

Pichelin S., Whittington I. and Pearson J. (1991) Concinnocotyla (Monogenea: Polystomatidae), a new genus for the polystome from the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri. Systematic Parasitology, 18 2: 81-93. doi:10.1007/BF00017660


Author Pichelin S.
Whittington I.
Pearson J.
Title Concinnocotyla (Monogenea: Polystomatidae), a new genus for the polystome from the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri
Journal name Systematic Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-5752
Publication date 1991-01-01
Year available 1991
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF00017660
Open Access Status
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 81
End page 93
Total pages 13
Publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
2405 Parasitology
Abstract Pseudopolystoma australensis is redescribed from new material from the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi) from a natural population in Queensland, Australia. It is transferred to a new genus, Concinnocotyla, as Concinnocotyla australensis n. comb. in a new subfamily, the Concinnocotylinae. The genus Concinnocotyla differs from all other polystome genera in each of the following characters: haptoral suckers bilaterally symmetrical rather than radially symmetrical, with elaborate skeleton of sclerites rather than no sclerites; hamuli, a single pair between marginal hooklets I and II rather than between II and III; a pocket posteriorly on each caecum that opens dorsally; sperm-filled sac between pockets; testes numerous, discrete, cylindrical; seminal vesicle large, discrete, muscular; penis elongate, muscular, unarmed, extensile; penis-bulb large, muscular, with intrinsic glands; host, a dipnoan. A detailed description of the adult parasite is presented and its unique features are discussed. The absence of a true oral sucker is noted. Confirmation of a polystome from a natural population of Australian lungfish has interesting evolutionary implications.
Keyword Parasitology
Parasitology
PARASITOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ResearcherID Downloads - Archived
Scopus Import - Archived
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 14 Jun 2014, 04:37:30 EST by System User