Intravascular device use, management, documentation and complications: a point prevalence survey

New, Karen A., Webster, Joan, Marsh, Nicole M. and Hewer, Barbara (2014) Intravascular device use, management, documentation and complications: a point prevalence survey. Australian Health Review, 38 3: 345-349. doi:10.1071/AH13111


Author New, Karen A.
Webster, Joan
Marsh, Nicole M.
Hewer, Barbara
Title Intravascular device use, management, documentation and complications: a point prevalence survey
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2014-06-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH13111
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 3
Start page 345
End page 349
Total pages 5
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective. To examine the use, management, documentation and complications for intravascular devices in cardiac, medical and surgical inpatients.
Methods. A point prevalence survey was undertaken in a large tertiary hospital in Queensland. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data.
Results. Of the 327 patients assessed, 192 (58.7%) had one or more devices in situ. Of the 220 devices, 190 (86.4%) were peripheral venous catheters, 25 (11.4%) were peripherally inserted central catheters and five (2.3%) were central venous catheters. Sixty-two of 220 devices (28.2%) were in situ without a clear purpose, whereas 54 (24.7%) had one or more complications, such as redness, pain, tracking, oedema or oozing. There was no documentation on the daily patient care record to indicate that a site assessment had occurred within the past 8 h for 25% of the devices in situ.
Conclusions. The present study identified several problems and highlighted areas for improvement in the management and documentation for intravascular devices. Ongoing education, promoting good clinical practice and reauditing, can be applied to improve the management of devices.
Keyword Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Health Care Sciences & Services
HEALTH CARE SCIENCES & SERVICES
HEALTH POLICY & SERVICES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 13 Jun 2014, 22:33:39 EST by Ms Karen New on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work