Monaco with bananas, a tropical Manhattan, or a Singapore for Central America? Explaining rapid urban growth in Panama City, Panama

Sigler, Thomas J. (2014) Monaco with bananas, a tropical Manhattan, or a Singapore for Central America? Explaining rapid urban growth in Panama City, Panama. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 35 2: 261-278. doi:10.1111/sjtg.12058

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Author Sigler, Thomas J.
Title Monaco with bananas, a tropical Manhattan, or a Singapore for Central America? Explaining rapid urban growth in Panama City, Panama
Journal name Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0129-7619
1467-9493
Publication date 2014-04-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/sjtg.12058
Volume 35
Issue 2
Start page 261
End page 278
Total pages 18
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The built environment of Panama City, Panama, has undergone a transformative change over the past decade. Hundreds of high-rise residential towers have sprung up in and around its central business district, eliciting comparisons with Singapore, New York and Dubai insofar as journalists, real estate boosters and politicians have associated the increase in tall buildings with a commensurate increase in global status. Concurrently, on the urban periphery, scores of uniform housing estates have been erected to house an upwardly mobile middle class. Triggered by the handover of the Panama Canal and the surrounding Canal Zone in 1999, the city's pronounced building boom has corresponded with the highest rates of economic growth in Latin America. This paper examines the complex factors behind the recent transformation of Panama City from a historical-morphological perspective. While the drivers of demand for real property were primarily global, the determinants of supply have been highly localized, suggesting that the interface between the global and the local is a fundamental catalyst of changes in the urban landscape.
Keyword Urban growth
Panama
Latin America
Sprawl
Property markets
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 15 APR 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 11 Jun 2014, 19:32:36 EST by Claire Lam on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management