Associations between anxious-depressed symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors in a longitudinal childhood study

Louise, Sandra, Warrington, Nicole M., McCaskie, Pamela A., Oddy, Wendy H., Zubrick, Stephen R., Hands, Beth, Mori, Trevor A., Briollais, Laurent, Silburn, Sven, Palmer, Lyle J., Mattes, Eugen and Beilin, Lawrence J. (2012) Associations between anxious-depressed symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors in a longitudinal childhood study. Preventive Medicine, 54 5: 345-350. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.03.004


Author Louise, Sandra
Warrington, Nicole M.
McCaskie, Pamela A.
Oddy, Wendy H.
Zubrick, Stephen R.
Hands, Beth
Mori, Trevor A.
Briollais, Laurent
Silburn, Sven
Palmer, Lyle J.
Mattes, Eugen
Beilin, Lawrence J.
Title Associations between anxious-depressed symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors in a longitudinal childhood study
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 2012-05-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.03.004
Volume 54
Issue 5
Start page 345
End page 350
Total pages 6
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2713 Epidemiology
Abstract Objective: To examine the influence of anxious/depressed scores on cardiovascular risk factors throughout childhood. Methods: Data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, a study of 2900 pregnancies recruited between 1989 and 1991, were used. Anxious-depressed scores (derived from the Childhood Behavior Checklist), body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were measured at 5 (n = 1681), 8 (n = 1697), 10 (n = 1575) and 14 (n = 1386) years. At age 14 depressive symptom scores (Beck Depression Inventory for Youth), anxious-depressed scores (Youth Self-Report (YSR) and Teacher Report Form (TRF)) and fasting lipid, glucose and insulin were also available. Cross sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted. Results: At age 14, girls with higher anxious-depressed scores had higher BMI (p≤0.005) and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (p≤0.0001). This equated to a difference of 0.6kg/m 2 and 0.3 units in predicted BMI and HOMA-IR respectively (top 5% vs. score of zero). Boys with higher anxious-depressed scores had lower systolic blood pressure trajectories (p=0.024). Conclusion: Depressive scores appear to have differing influences on BMI, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and systolic blood pressure in boys and girls. Paradoxically boys with higher anxious-depressed scores had lower blood pressure throughout childhood.
Keyword Cardiovascular disease
Child
Depression
Lifestyle
Risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Jun 2014, 01:20:49 EST by Kylie Hengst on behalf of UQ Diamantina Institute