The impact of breastfeeding on FTO-related BMI growth trajectories: An application to the Raine pregnancy cohort study

Abarin, Taraneh, wu, Yan Yan, Warrington, Nicole, Lye, Stephen, Pennell, Craig and Briollais, Laurent (2012) The impact of breastfeeding on FTO-related BMI growth trajectories: An application to the Raine pregnancy cohort study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 41 6: 1650-1660. doi:10.1093/ije/dys171


Author Abarin, Taraneh
wu, Yan Yan
Warrington, Nicole
Lye, Stephen
Pennell, Craig
Briollais, Laurent
Title The impact of breastfeeding on FTO-related BMI growth trajectories: An application to the Raine pregnancy cohort study
Journal name International Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-5771
1464-3685
Publication date 2012-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dys171
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 41
Issue 6
Start page 1650
End page 1660
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
Abstract Introduction: For years, body mass index (BMI) has been used by scientists to track weight problems and obesity in children and adults. Recent studies have implicated the fat mass and obesity gene (FTO) in the increase of BMI in young adults. A longer duration of breastfeeding is known to reduce the risk of being overweight later in life, but its ability to modify the effect because of FTO is not known. Methods: We studied 1096 children from the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine) cohort who were followed up from birth to 14 years of age. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate BMI growth trajectories in boys and girls separately. Results: An association was found between BMI growth and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EXBF) among carriers of the risk allele of the FTO SNP rs9939609. In girls, EXBF interacts with the SNP at baseline and can reverse the increase in BMI because of SNP risk allele by age 14 years after 3 months of EXBF. In boys, EXBF reduces BMI both in carriers and non-carriers of the risk allele with an association found after 10 years of age. Six months of EXBF will put the boys' BMI growth curves back to the normal range. Conclusions: Our study could have major health implications by providing new perspectives for the prevention of growth problems in children carrying risk alleles in the FTO gene.
Keyword Australia
Breastfeeding
Children
Growth
Longitudinal study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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