Rice increases productivity compared to other carbohydrate supplements in dairy cows grazing kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinum), but not ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), pastures

Trevaskis L.M., Fulkerson W.J. and Nandra K.S. (2004) Rice increases productivity compared to other carbohydrate supplements in dairy cows grazing kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinum), but not ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), pastures. Livestock Production Science, 87 2-3: 197-206. doi:10.1016/j.livprodsci.2003.08.004


Author Trevaskis L.M.
Fulkerson W.J.
Nandra K.S.
Title Rice increases productivity compared to other carbohydrate supplements in dairy cows grazing kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinum), but not ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), pastures
Journal name Livestock Production Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-6226
Publication date 2004-01-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.livprodsci.2003.08.004
Open Access Status
Volume 87
Issue 2-3
Start page 197
End page 206
Total pages 10
Publisher ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
3400 Veterinary
Abstract The effect of four carbohydrate supplements on the productivity of dairy cows grazing short rotation ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) or kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinum) pastures were assessed. When grazing kikuyu, four groups of 20 cows (14 in early and 6 in late lactation) were matched for production and live-weight and were supplemented with 4 kg dry matter (DM)/cow day of either finely rolled barley (B), finely rolled barley sucrose mix (ratio 3:1) (BS), cracked maize (M) or finely milled rice (R), over a 35-day experimental period following a 21-day adjustment period. The production of cows in early (P<0.001; 17.6 vs. 15.2 l milk/cow day; 516 vs. 455 g protein/cow day for cows fed R and the remainder, respectively), but not late, lactation fed rice was significantly higher reflecting the higher (P<0.007) digestible organic matter intake of kikuyu pasture of these animals (9.4, 7.2, 7.2 and 6.4 kg/cow day, for cows fed R, BG, B or M, respectively). Cows given rice also had higher (P<0.01) in vivo organic matter digestibility of kikuyu (69.6 vs. 61.1% for R and the remainder, respectively). Although there was no significant difference between the groups in milk nitrogen (N) (g/cow day) output as a percentage of total N intake (mean: 17.6%), milk urea concentration was significantly lower (P<0.001; 27.9 vs. 33.6 mg milk urea/100 ml) and live-weight increased more (0.03 vs. -0.18 kg live-weight change/cow day), in cows fed rice than in the remaining groups, respectively, indicating an overall improvement in N balance. The excretion of starch in the faeces of cows fed maize (596 vs. 174 g/cow day for cows fed M and the remainder, respectively), was significantly greater (P<0.001). When barley or rice was fed to cows grazing ryegrass pasture there was no differences in any of the response variables. The results of this study show that the milk response was greatest to rice as opposed to barley or maize, when Holstein-Friesian dairy cows grazed kikuyu. Rice also had the highest in sacco organic matter digestibility in the rumen. It was hypothesised that this increased productivity to feeding rice was due to the availability of more fermentable energy in the rumen which would result in synchronising more N available from kikuyu for the synthesis of microbial protein as compared to cows fed barley. However, there were nutrient differences between the four carbohydrate sources which may, in part, be responsible for the production responses.
Keyword Carbohydrate supplements
Kikuyu
Microbial protein
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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