Evaluating the feasibility of using insecticide quantification kits (IQK) for estimating cyanopyrethroid levels for indoor residual spraying in Vanuatu

Russell, Tanya L., Morgan, John C., Ismail, Hanafy, Kaur, Harparkash, Eggelte, Teunis, Oladepo, Folasade, Amon, James, Hemingway, Janet, Iata, Harry and Paine, Mark J. I. (2014) Evaluating the feasibility of using insecticide quantification kits (IQK) for estimating cyanopyrethroid levels for indoor residual spraying in Vanuatu. Malaria Journal, 13 1: . doi:10.1186/1475-2875-13-178


Author Russell, Tanya L.
Morgan, John C.
Ismail, Hanafy
Kaur, Harparkash
Eggelte, Teunis
Oladepo, Folasade
Amon, James
Hemingway, Janet
Iata, Harry
Paine, Mark J. I.
Title Evaluating the feasibility of using insecticide quantification kits (IQK) for estimating cyanopyrethroid levels for indoor residual spraying in Vanuatu
Journal name Malaria Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2875
Publication date 2014-05-09
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-13-178
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 1
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
The quality of routine indoor residual spraying (IRS) operations is rarely assessed because of the limited choice of methods available for quantifying insecticide content in the field. This study, therefore, evaluated a user-friendly, rapid colorimetric assay for detecting insecticide content after routine IRS operations were conducted.

Methods
This study was conducted in Tafea Province, Vanuatu. Routine IRS was conducted with lambda cyhalothrin. Two methods were used to quantify the IRS activities: 1) pre-spray application of small felt pads and 2) post-spray removal of insecticide with adhesive. The insecticide content was quantified using a colorimetric assay (Insecticide Quantification Kit [IQK]), which involved exposing each sample to the test reagents for 15 mins. The concentration of insecticide was indicated by the depth of red colour.

Results
The IQK proved simple to perform in the field and results could be immediately interpreted by the programme staff. The insecticide content was successfully sampled by attaching felt pads to the house walls prior to spraying. The IRS operation was well conducted, with 83% of houses being sprayed at the target dose (20 – 30 mg AI/m2). The average reading across all houses was 24.4 ± 1.5 mg AI/m2. The results from the felt pads applied pre-spray were used as a base to compare methods for sampling insecticide from walls post-spray. The adhesive of Sellotape did not collect adequate samples. However, the adhesive of the felt pads provided accurate samples of the insecticide content on walls.

Conclusion
The IQK colorimetric assay proved to be a useful tool that was simple to use under realistic field conditions. The assay provided rapid information on IRS spray dynamics and spray team performance, facilitating timely decision making and reporting for programme managers. The IQK colorimetric assay will have direct applications for routine quality control in malaria control programmes globally and has the potential to improve the efficacy of vector control operations.
Keyword Colorimetric assay
Insecticide residual spray (IRS)
Vanuatu
Insecticide quantification kit
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article no. 13:178

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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