Concurrent 3-D sonifications enable the head-up monitoring of two interrelated aircraft navigation instruments

Towers, John, Burgess-Limerick, Robin and Riek, Stephan (2014) Concurrent 3-D sonifications enable the head-up monitoring of two interrelated aircraft navigation instruments. Human Factors, 56 8: 1414-1427. doi:10.1177/0018720814536443

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Towers, John
Burgess-Limerick, Robin
Riek, Stephan
Title Concurrent 3-D sonifications enable the head-up monitoring of two interrelated aircraft navigation instruments
Journal name Human Factors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-7208
1547-8181
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0018720814536443
Volume 56
Issue 8
Start page 1414
End page 1427
Total pages 14
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to enable the head-up monitoring of two interrelated aircraft navigation instruments by developing a 3-D auditory display that encodes this navigation information within two spatially discrete sonifications.

Background: Head-up monitoring of aircraft navigation information utilizing 3-D audio displays, particularly involving concurrently presented sonifications, requires additional research.

Method: A flight simulator’s head-down waypoint bearing and course deviation instrument readouts were conveyed to participants via a 3-D auditory display. Both readouts were separately represented by a colocated pair of continuous sounds, one fixed and the other varying in pitch, which together encoded the instrument value’s deviation from the norm. Each sound pair’s position in the listening space indicated the left/right parameter of its instrument’s readout. Participants’ accuracy in navigating a predetermined flight plan was evaluated while performing a head-up task involving the detection of visual flares in the out-of-cockpit scene.

Results: The auditory display significantly improved aircraft heading and course deviation accuracy, head-up time, and flare detections. Head tracking did not improve performance by providing participants with the ability to orient potentially conflicting sounds, suggesting that the use of integrated localizing cues was successful.

Conclusion: A supplementary 3-D auditory display enabled effective head-up monitoring of interrelated navigation information normally attended to through a head-down display.

Application: Pilots operating aircraft, such as helicopters and unmanned aerial vehicles, may benefit from a supplementary auditory display because they navigate in two dimensions while performing head-up, out-of-aircraft, visual tasks.
Keyword Auditory displays
Multimodality displays
Flight displays
Audition
Situation awareness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print May 29, 2014

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 03 Jun 2014, 00:51:24 EST by Dr Robin Burgess-limerick on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre