Heterogeneity of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum using repetitive element sequence-based PCR: municipal water an unlikely source of community-acquired infections

Thomson, R. M., Tolson, C. E., Carter, R., Huygens, F. and Hargreaves, M. (2014) Heterogeneity of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum using repetitive element sequence-based PCR: municipal water an unlikely source of community-acquired infections. Epidemiology and Infection, 142 10: 2057-2064. doi:10.1017/S0950268813003257


Author Thomson, R. M.
Tolson, C. E.
Carter, R.
Huygens, F.
Hargreaves, M.
Title Heterogeneity of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum using repetitive element sequence-based PCR: municipal water an unlikely source of community-acquired infections
Formatted title
Heterogeneity of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum using repetitive element sequence-based PCR: municipal water an unlikely source of community-acquired infections

Journal name Epidemiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-4409
0950-2688
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268813003257
Volume 142
Issue 10
Start page 2057
End page 2064
Total pages 8
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
M. fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium associated with community-acquired and nosocomial wound, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections. It has been postulated that water has been the source of infection especially in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to determine if municipal water may be the source of community-acquired or nosocomial infections in the Brisbane area. Between 2007 and 2009, 20 strains of M. fortuitum were recovered from municipal water and 53 patients’ isolates were submitted to the reference laboratory. A wide variation in strain types was identified using repetitive element sequence-based PCR, with 13 clusters of ≥2 indistinguishable isolates, and 28 patterns consisting of individual isolates. The clusters could be grouped into seven similar groups (>95% similarity). Municipal water and clinical isolates collected during the same time period and from the same geographical area consisted of different strain types, making municipal water an unlikely source of sporadic human infection.
Keyword Clinical microbiology
Infectious disease
Mycobacteria
Water-borne infections
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 28 May 2014, 16:10:39 EST by Dr Rachel Thomson on behalf of Medicine - Greenslopes Private Hospital