Strain variation amongst clinical and potable water isolates of M. kansasii using automated repetitive unit PCR

Thomson, Rachel, Tolson, Carla, Huygens, Flavia and Hargreaves, Megan (2014) Strain variation amongst clinical and potable water isolates of M. kansasii using automated repetitive unit PCR. International Journal of Medical Microbiology, 304 3-4: 484-489. doi:10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.02.004


Author Thomson, Rachel
Tolson, Carla
Huygens, Flavia
Hargreaves, Megan
Title Strain variation amongst clinical and potable water isolates of M. kansasii using automated repetitive unit PCR
Formatted title
Strain variation amongst clinical and potable water isolates of M. kansasii using automated repetitive unit PCR
Journal name International Journal of Medical Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1438-4221
1618-0607
Publication date 2014-05-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.02.004
Open Access Status
Volume 304
Issue 3-4
Start page 484
End page 489
Total pages 6
Place of publication Jena, Germany
Publisher Urban und Fischer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Mycobacterium kansasii is a pulmonary pathogen that has been grown readily from municipal water, but rarely isolated from natural waters. A definitive link between water exposure and disease has not been demonstrated and the environmental niche for this organism is poorly understood. Strain typing of clinical isolates has revealed seven subtypes with Type 1 being highly clonal and responsible for most infections worldwide. The prevalence of other subtypes varies geographically. In this study 49 water isolates are compared with 72 patient isolates from the same geographical area (Brisbane, Australia), using automated repetitive unit PCR (Diversilab) and ITS_RFLP. The clonality of the dominant clinical strain type is again demonstrated but with rep-PCR, strain variation within this group is evident comparable with other reported methods. There is significant heterogeneity of water isolates and very few are similar or related to the clinical isolates. This suggests that if water or aerosol transmission is the mode of infection, then point source contamination likely occurs from an alternative environmental source.
Keyword Mycobacterium kansasii
Nontuberculous mycobacteria
Molecular epidemiology
Genotyping
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 28 May 2014, 16:06:11 EST by Dr Rachel Thomson on behalf of Medicine - Greenslopes Private Hospital