An argument for probabilistic coastal hazard assessment: Retrospective examination of practice in New South Wales, Australia

Wainwright, D. J., Ranasinghe, R., Callaghan, D. P., Woodroffe, C. D., Cowell, P. J. and Rogers, K. (2014) An argument for probabilistic coastal hazard assessment: Retrospective examination of practice in New South Wales, Australia. Ocean and Coastal Management, 95 147-155. doi:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2014.04.009


Author Wainwright, D. J.
Ranasinghe, R.
Callaghan, D. P.
Woodroffe, C. D.
Cowell, P. J.
Rogers, K.
Title An argument for probabilistic coastal hazard assessment: Retrospective examination of practice in New South Wales, Australia
Journal name Ocean and Coastal Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0964-5691
1873-524X
Publication date 2014-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2014.04.009
Volume 95
Start page 147
End page 155
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
1910 Oceanography
Abstract Determination of coastal hazard lines is a key task for coastal engineers worldwide. While current practice differs from country to country and even within countries, in many coastal hazard assessments three main components of coastline recession are taken into account: episodic recession due to storm erosion, long term recession due to an imbalance in sediment transport, and recession due to sea-level rise. In Australia, the state of New South Wales has a well-established procedure for the definition of coastal hazards that has evolved since the 1970's. Accepted practice in NSW is intentionally conservative, due to uncertainties and a limited understanding of physical processes. This article (i) provides an historical perspective on the development of the established methodology; (ii) discusses the various components of coastal hazard considered, and (iii) examines the way in which these components can be combined. Suggestions are subsequently provided for a way forward that better suits emerging risk-based coastal management/planning frameworks. The article also considers the advantages and practicalities associated with assigning numerical probabilities to hazard lines as part of risk-based coastal management.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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