Understanding why landholders choose to participate or withdraw from conservation programs: a case study from a Queensland conservation auction

Comerford, Emma (2014) Understanding why landholders choose to participate or withdraw from conservation programs: a case study from a Queensland conservation auction. Journal of Environmental Management, 141 169-176. doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.049


Author Comerford, Emma
Title Understanding why landholders choose to participate or withdraw from conservation programs: a case study from a Queensland conservation auction
Journal name Journal of Environmental Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-8630
0301-4797
Publication date 2014-08-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.01.049
Volume 141
Start page 169
End page 176
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Ensuring adequate participation by private landholders in a conservation scheme is a challenge for program managers around the world. This paper uses a case study of the Vegetation Incentives Program from Queensland, Australia, to contribute additional information to the literature on influences on participation in conservation, and to offer insight into ways to improve program design to optimise participation. The research is particularly of interest to programs that include a tender mechanism or conservation covenant in their designs. Participation in the Vegetation Incentives Program was limited outside two small geographic areas, with the result that the budget was not expended. A survey of participants revealed that a narrow subset of the rural population was attracted to participate, namely highly educated, experienced landholders with positive environmental attitudes and a low opportunity cost of participation. The research also investigated why some landholders chose to withdraw from the program before full participation. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the analysis. There were a variety of reasons for making the decision to leave, including disliking the requirement for permanent protection, the tender mechanism employed, and not understanding the process well enough. This information can help improve conservation outcomes by understanding where to target limited efforts in a catchment, and clarifying the likely limitations of some aspects of scheme design.
Keyword Vegetation protection
Incentive programs
Conservation covenant
Attitudes
Participation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Economics Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 27 May 2014, 10:14:14 EST by System User on behalf of School of Economics