Working towards a Group A Streptococcal vaccine: report of a collaborative Trans-Tasman workshop

Moreland, Nicole J., Waddington, Claire S., Williamson, Deborah A., Sriskandan, Shiranee, Smeesters, Pierre R., Proft, Thomas, Steer, Andrew C., Walker, Mark J., Baker, Edward N., Baker, Michael G., Lennon, Diana, Dunbar, Rod and Fraser, John D. (2014) Working towards a Group A Streptococcal vaccine: report of a collaborative Trans-Tasman workshop. Vaccine, 32 30: 3713-3720. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.05.017


Author Moreland, Nicole J.
Waddington, Claire S.
Williamson, Deborah A.
Sriskandan, Shiranee
Smeesters, Pierre R.
Proft, Thomas
Steer, Andrew C.
Walker, Mark J.
Baker, Edward N.
Baker, Michael G.
Lennon, Diana
Dunbar, Rod
Fraser, John D.
Title Working towards a Group A Streptococcal vaccine: report of a collaborative Trans-Tasman workshop
Journal name Vaccine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-410X
1873-2518
Publication date 2014-06-24
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.05.017
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 32
Issue 30
Start page 3713
End page 3720
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections represent a major public health burden in both developing and developed countries. In Australia and New Zealand GAS associated diseases are serious problems in Indigenous populations and a major cause of health inequality. Political recognition of these inequalities is providing impetus for strategies that reduce GAS disease and the development of a GAS vaccine now has governmental support in both Australia and New Zealand. Accordingly, an expert workshop was convened in March 2013 to consider available data on GAS vaccines. M-protein based vaccines constructed from the hyper-variable N-terminal region (30-valent vaccine) or the conserved C-repeat domain (J8 vaccine) were reviewed together with vaccine candidates identified using multi high-throughput approaches. Performing a comprehensive assessment of regional GAS strain epidemiology, defining the immune correlates of protection, and the establishment of clinical trial sites were identified as critical activities for a Trans-Tasman vaccine development programme.
Formatted abstract
Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections represent a major public health burden in both developing and developed countries. In Australia and New Zealand GAS associated diseases are serious problems in Indigenous populations and a major cause of health inequality. Political recognition of these inequalities is providing impetus for strategies that reduce GAS disease and the development of a GAS vaccine now has governmental support in both Australia and New Zealand. Accordingly, an expert workshop was convened in March 2013 to consider available data on GAS vaccines. M-protein based vaccines constructed from the hyper-variable N-terminal region (30-valent vaccine) or the conserved C-repeat domain (J8 vaccine) were reviewed together with vaccine candidates identified using multi high-throughput approaches. Performing a comprehensive assessment of regional GAS strain epidemiology, defining the immune correlates of protection, and the establishment of clinical trial sites were identified as critical activities for a Trans-Tasman vaccine development programme.
Keyword Streptococcus pyogenes
Vaccine
M protein
Epidemiology
Rheumatic fever
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID BB/E52708X/1
G0800777
MC_PC_12015
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Fully published paper
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 23 May 2014, 22:04:28 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences