Investigation of the effect of deprivation on the burden and management of venous leg ulcers: a cohort study using the THIN database

Petherick, Emily S., Cullum, Nicky A. and Pickett, Kate E. (2013) Investigation of the effect of deprivation on the burden and management of venous leg ulcers: a cohort study using the THIN database. PLoS One, 8 3: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058948


Author Petherick, Emily S.
Cullum, Nicky A.
Pickett, Kate E.
Title Investigation of the effect of deprivation on the burden and management of venous leg ulcers: a cohort study using the THIN database
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-03-19
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0058948
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 3
Total pages 7
Place of publication San Francisco, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
There has been limited examination of the contribution of socio-economic factors to the development of leg ulcers, despite the social patterning of many underlying risk factors. No previous studies were found that examined social patterns in the quality of treatment received by patients with leg ulcers.

Methods
Using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database we identified a cohort of over 14000 patients with a diagnosis of venous leg ulceration, prospectively recorded between the years 2001 and 2006, with linked area-level socio-economic information (Townsend deprivation quintile). We assessed socio-economic differences in the incidence and prevalence of leg ulcers using negative binomial regression. Socio-economic differences in two key areas of guideline recommended leg ulcer management, arterial Doppler assessment and compression bandaging, were assessed using multilevel regression.

Results
The risk of incident venous leg ulceration increased for patients living in areas of higher deprivation, even after adjustment for known risk factors age and gender. Overall reported rates of Doppler assessment and provision of compression therapy were low, with less than sixteen per cent of patients having a database record of receiving these recommended diagnostic and treatment options. Patients diagnosed with incident venous leg ulcers living in the most deprived areas were less likely to receive the recommended Doppler-aided assessment for peripheral vascular disease than patients living in the least deprived areas (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.24–0.78). Documented provision of compression therapy did not vary with deprivation.

Conclusions
A socio-economic gradient in venous leg ulcer disease was observed. The overall rates of people with venous leg ulcers who were documented as receiving guideline recommended care (2001–2006) were low. Reported use of Doppler ultrasound assessment was negatively associated with socio-economic status. These findings suggest that the inequalities experienced by leg ulcer patients may be exacerbated by reduced access to guideline-based management.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article number e58948.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 May 2014, 21:41:24 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work