Therapist attitudes and beliefs relevant to client dropout revisited

Pulford, Justin, Adams, Peter and Sheridan, Janie (2008) Therapist attitudes and beliefs relevant to client dropout revisited. Community Mental Health Journal, 44 3: 181-186. doi:10.1007/s10597-007-9116-5


Author Pulford, Justin
Adams, Peter
Sheridan, Janie
Title Therapist attitudes and beliefs relevant to client dropout revisited
Journal name Community Mental Health Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0010-3853
1573-2789
Publication date 2008-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10597-007-9116-5
Volume 44
Issue 3
Start page 181
End page 186
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract This study replicates a survey conducted in the 1980s that examined therapist attitudes and beliefs relevant to client dropout. A revamped questionnaire modelled on the original was completed by 92% of therapists employed in the outpatient counselling arm of an alcohol and other drug treatment service. This questionnaire sought therapist perceptions of treatment length and client dropout as well as their preferred length of treatment engagement. Responses were then contrasted with known service attendance norms. As with the previous study, the results suggest therapists typically expect and prefer treatment of a considerably longer duration than the service mean and underestimate the rate of client dropout.
Keyword Client dropout
Perspective divergence
Therapist attitudes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 18:30:21 EST by Justin Pulford on behalf of School of Public Health