Managing urban water crises: adaptive policy responses to drought and flood in Southeast Queensland, Australia

Head, Brian W. (2014) Managing urban water crises: adaptive policy responses to drought and flood in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Ecology and Society, 19 2: 33.1-33.14. doi:10.5751/ES-06414-190233


Author Head, Brian W.
Title Managing urban water crises: adaptive policy responses to drought and flood in Southeast Queensland, Australia
Journal name Ecology and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1708-3087
Publication date 2014-05-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5751/ES-06414-190233
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 19
Issue 2
Start page 33.1
End page 33.14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Waterloo, ON, Canada
Publisher Resilience Alliance Publications
Language eng
Abstract In this case study, I examine the quality of decision-making under conditions of rapidly evolving urban water crises, and the adaptive policy challenges of building regional resilience in response to both drought and flood. Like other regions of Australia, Southeast Queensland has been subject to substantial cycles of drought and flood. I draw on resilience literature concerning sustainability, together with governance literature on policy change, to explain the changing awareness of urban water crises and the strategic options available for addressing these crises in this case study. The problem of resilience thinking opens up a number of important questions about the efficacy and adaptability of the policy system. The case provides insights into the interplay between the ways in which problems are framed, the knowledge bases required for planning and decision-making, the collaborative governance processes required for managing complex and rapidly evolving issues, and the overall capacity for policy learning over time. Regional resilience was proclaimed as a policy goal by government, but the practices remained largely anchored in traditional technical frameworks. Centralized investment decisions and governance restructures provoked conflict between levels of government, undermining the capacity of stakeholders to create more consensual approaches to problem-solving and limiting the collective learning that could have emerged.
Keyword Policy learning
Regional resilience
Urban water crisis
Water governance
Water policy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol19/iss2/art33/

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 21 May 2014, 17:26:08 EST by Professor Brian Head on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups